Tag Archives: Bizkaia

Decide

  • Menéame0

a:  to make a final choice or judgment about

b:  to select as a course of action

c:  to infer on the basis of evidence:  conclude

d:  to bring to a definitive end

e:  to induce to come to a choice

f:  to make a choice or judgment

Within the context of the swell and unparalleled power that we individuals are able to exercise in the so-called Western society regarding the ability to choose from an unborn baby’s sex to religion, citizenship and even physical aspect, it is incomprehensible how difficult it becomes when addressing the issue of exercising the rights of political national groups and their capability to decide on a collective basis.

From the 28th to the 30th of May, international experts debated the meaning of Basque nationhood in a globalizing world in Bilbao. Organized by the International Catalan Institute for Peace, the Peace Research Institute of Oslo, and the University of the Basque Country, the meeting explored the meaning of sovereignty from many different angles as it is everyday practiced. On the last day of the conference, local social groups shared their experiences on practicing “sovereignty” by acting upon it on their daily decisions, for instance, about promoting the use of the Basque language, Euskera, the respect for our environment, and defending the workers’ rights. Among those groups, Gure Esku Dago (It’s in our hands) embodies this theoretical concept of “sovereignty” as an initiative in favor of the right to decide. On the 8th of June, this popular initiative will organize a human chain of 123 kilometers uniting the cities of Durango (Bizkaia) and Iruña (Navarre). As of today, more than 100,000 people are supporting the event, in the homeland as well as in the diaspora.

Gure-Esku-Dago-Argentina“Gure Esku Dago” in Argentina. Supported by the Federation of Basque-Argentinean Entities (FEVA).

Coincidentally, on the 29th the Basque Autonomous Community Parliament (Basque Parliament, hereafter) adopted, by a majority vote, a resolution on the right of self-determination of the Basque People as a basic democratic right as it previously did in 1990, 2002 and 2006. Two days and 20 years earlier, the Public Law 8/1994, passed by the Basque Parliament, became the current legal framework of institutional relationship between the Basque Autonomous Community and the diaspora, which was established in order to “preserve and reinforce links between Basque Communities and Centers on the one hand, and the Basque Country on the other hand,” and to “facilitate the establishment of channels of communication between Basque residents outside the Basque Autonomous Community, and the public authorities of the latter.” Indeed, the passing of the law itself became a clear act of sovereignty, which legally recognized the existence of a large population of Basque people outside its administrative borders—a true transnational  community of citizens—and provided a formal framework for collaboration. Looking back there is a need to acknowledge the visionary work done by Karmelo Sáinz de la Maza—the main person behind the law—or the late Jokin Intxausti—the first government delegate in charge of re-establishing contacts with the various Basque diaspora associations and communities—among many others.

Carmelo_Urza_Jokin_Intxausti_and_William_A_DouglassCarmelo Urza, Jokin Intxausti, and William Douglass, at the then Basque Studies Program, University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), 1986. Photo Source: Basque Library, UNR.

Also, the anniversary of the Law 8/1994, which surprisingly has passed unnoticed, offers us an opportunity to rethink our identity in terms of a borderless citizenship within the context of the current Basque presence in the world. The fact is that the reality of today’s mobility and return to the Basque Country is quite different from past emigration waves. It is necessary, in my opinion, to adequate the law to the new flows of migration and return, while enhancing and strengthening the programs towards the needs and demands of individuals and associations with the goal of intertwining a solid global network based on common interests.

Creative_Commons

Your email:

 

Recap: Volume III, 2013

  • Menéame0

Similar to the imminent art of improvising verses in the Basque language, or bertsolaritza, our life, especially in the digital world, is ephemeral. This oral tradition reaffirms and expresses an identity rooted in a specific area but with a global projection thanks to the emergent technologies of information and communication. Since its inception Basque Identity 2.0 has assumed the challenge of its own fugacity by exploring different expressions of Basque identity, understood in transnational terms, through a global medium. Perhaps, this comes down to accepting that our ephemeral condition is what really helps to shape our collective memory and identity, and which are constantly revisited and reconstructed.

Bertsolaritza-2013Maialen Lujanbio, bertsolari or Basque verse improviser, sings about the Basque diaspora. Basque Country Championship, Barakaldo (Bizkaia), December 15, 2013. Source: Bertsoa.

In June, we celebrated the 4th anniversary of Basque Identity 2.0. I would like to acknowledge our colleagues and friends from A Basque in Boise, About the Basque Country, EITB.com and Hella Basque for their continuous support and encouragement (“Sucede que a veces”—“It happens sometimes,” May post).

We began the year reflecting on our historical memory, which has increasingly become a recurrent topic in the blog for the past two years. Through the stories of Pedro Junkera Zarate—a Basque child refugee in Belgium from the Spanish Civil war—Jules Caillaux—his foster dad while in Belgium, and one of the “Righteous among the Nations”—and Facundo Sáez Izaguirre—a Basque militiaman who fought against Franco and flew into exile—I attempted to bring some light into a dark period of our history. Their life stories are similar to some extent to many others whose testimonies are critical to understand our most recent history of self-destruction and trauma (“Algunas personas buenas”—“Some good people,” February post). Some of these stories are part of an ongoing oral history project on Basque migration and return. As part of the research I was able go back to the United States to conduct further interviews and to initiate a new community-based project called “Memoria Bizia” (“#EuskalWest2013,” November post).

In addition, May 22 marked the 75th anniversary of the massive escape from Fort Alfonso XII, also known as Fort San Cristóbal, in Navarre, which became one of the largest and most tragic prison breaks, during wartime, in contemporary Europe. This was the most visited post in 2013 (“The fourth man of California,” March post).

On the politics of memory, I also explored the meaning of “not-forgetting” in relation to the different commemorations regarding the siege of Barcelona 299 years ago, the coup d’état against the government of Salvador Allende 40 years ago, and the 12th anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States. Coincidentally, September 11th was the date of these three historical tragic events (“El no-olvido”—“Not-to-forget,” September post).

The Spanish right-wing newspaper ABC led the destruction of the persona of the late Basque-American Pete Cenarrusa, former Secretary of the State of Idaho (United States), by publishing an unspeakable obituary. Nine blogs from both sides of the Atlantic (A Basque in Boise, About Basque CountryBasque Identity 2.0Bieter Blog, 8 Probintziak, Nafar Herria, EuskoSare, Blog do Tsavkko – The Angry Brazilian, and Buber’s Basque Page) signed a common post, written in four different languages, to defend Cenarrusa (“Pete Cenarrusaren defentsan. In Memorian (1917-2013)”—“In defense of Pete Cenarrusa. In Memorian (1917-2013),” October post). It was a good example of digital networking and collaboration for a common cause. However, this was not an isolated event regarding the Basque diaspora. Sadly, nearly at the same time, ABC’s sister tabloid El Correo published a series of defamatory reports against the former president of the Basque Club of New York. Once again, ignorance and hatred laid beneath the personal attacks against public figures, for the only reason of being of Basque origin.

Basque literature, in the Spanish and English languages, was quite present in the blog throughout the year. Mikel Varas, Santi Pérez Isasi, and Iván Repila are among the most prolific and original Basque artists of Bilbao, conforming a true generation in the Basque literature landscape of the 21st century (“Nosotros, Bilbao”—“We, Bilbao,” April post). The year 2013 also marked the 10th anniversary of “Flammis Acribus Addictis,” one of most acclaimed poetry books of the late Sergio Oiarzabal, who left us three years ago (“Flammis Acribus Addictis,” June post). The blog also featured the late Basque-American author Mary Jean Etcheberry-Morton’s book, “Oui Oui Oui of the Pyrenees”, which is a welcoming breath of fresh air for the younger readers (“Yes!July post).

This has been a year filled with opportunities and challenges. Personally, I have been inspired by the greatness of those who keep moving forward in spite of tragedy and unforeseen setbacks, and by those who are at the frontline of volunteering (“Aurrera”—“Forward,” December post).

Thank you all for being there. Now, you can also find us on Facebook. I would love to hear from you. Happy New Year!

Eskerrik asko eta Urte berri on!

(NOTE: Remember to use Google Translate. No more excuses about not fully understanding the language of the post).

Creative_Commons

Your email:

 

#EuskalWest2013

  • Menéame0

In memory of Lydia (Sillonis Chacartegui) Jausoro (1920-2013)

“When he first came to the mountains his life was far away… He climbed cathedral mountains. Saw silver clouds below. Saw everything as far as you can see. And they say that he got crazy once. And he tried to touch the sun…”

John Denver (Rocky Mountain High, 1972)

By the time “Rocky Mountain High” became one of the most popular folk songs in America, the North American Basque Organizations (NABO) was an incipient reality. During a visit to Argentina, Basque-Puerto Rican bibliographer Jon Bilbao Azkarate learnt about the Federation of Basque Argentinean Entities (FEVA in its Spanish acronym), which was established in 1955. Bilbao, through the Center for Basque Studies (the then Basque Studies Program) at the University of Nevada, Reno, was the promoter of a series of encounters among Basque associations and individuals, which led to the establishment of NABO in 1973. Its founding members were the clubs of Bakersfield and San Francisco (California); Ontario (Oregon); Boise (Idaho); Grand Junction (Colorado); and Elko, Ely, and Reno (Nevada).

Following last year’s field trip into the Basque-American memory landscape of migration and settlement throughout the American West, I arrived on time for the celebration of the 40th anniversary of NABO that took place in Elko, Nevada, during the first weekend of July. NABO’s 2013 convention was hosted by the Euzkaldunak Basque club, which coincidentally celebrated the 50th anniversary of its National Basque Festival.

NABO-Convention-2013-ElkoNorth American Basque Organizations’ officers, delegates and guests. (Elko, Nevada. July 5th.) (For further information please read Argitxu Camus’ book on the history of NABO.)

On the last day of the festival, NABO president, Valerie Arrechea, presented NABO’s “Bizi Emankorra” or lifetime achievement award to Jim Ithurralde (Eureka, Nevada) and Bob Goicoechea (Elko) for their significant contribution to NABO. Both men were instrumental in the creation of an embryonic Basque federation back in 1973.

Goicoechea-Arrechea-IthurraldeBob Goicoechea (on the right), Valerie Arrechea, and Jim Ithurralde. (Elko, Nevada, July 7th.)

The main goal of my latest summer trip was to initiate a community-based project, called “Memoria Bizia” (The Living Memory), with the goals of collecting, preserving and disseminating the personal oral recollections and testimonies of those who left their country of birth as well as their descendants born in the United States and Canada. Indeed, we are witnessing how rapidly the last Basque migrant and exile generation is unfortunately vanishing. Consequently, I was thrilled to learn that NABO will lead the initiative. The collaboration and active involvement of the Basque communities in the project is paramount for its success. Can we afford to lose our past as told by the people who went through the actual process of migrating and resettlement? Please watch the following video so that you may get a better idea of what the NABO Memoria Bizia project may look like.

This video “Gure Bizitzen Pasarteak—Fragments of our lives” was recorded in 2012, and it shows a selection of interviews conducted with Basque refugees, exiles and emigrants that returned to the Basque Country. The video is part of a larger oral history research project at the University of Deusto.

While being at the Center for Basque Studies in Reno, the road took me to different Basque gatherings in Elko, San Francisco, and Boise.

Basque-Library-RenoBasque Studies Library sign outside the Knowledge Center, University of Nevada, Reno. Established in the late 1960s, the Basque library is the largest repository of its kind outside Europe.

Jordan-Valley-Basque-SignOn the US-95 North going through Jordan Valley, Oregon.

During my stay I was lucky to conduct a couple of interviews with two elder Basque-American women. One of them was Lydia Victoria Jausoro, “Amuma Lil,” who sadly passed away on November 14th at the age of 93. Lydia was born in 1920 in Mountain Home (Idaho) to Pablo Sillonis and Julia Chacartegui. Her dad was born in Ispaster in 1881 and her mother in the nearby town of Lekeitio in 1888. Both Pablo and Julia left the Basque province of Bizkaia in 1900 and 1905 respectively. They met in Boise, where they married. Soon after, Lydia’s parents moved to Mountain Home, where she grew up. She had five brothers. Lydia went to the Boise Business University and later on, in 1946, married Louie Jausoro Mallea in Nampa. Lydia and Louie had two daughters, Juliana and Robbie Lou. (Louie was born in 1919 in Silver City (Idaho) and died in 2005 in Boise. His father, Tomás, was from Eskoriatza (Gipuzkoa) and his mother, Tomasa, from Ereño, Bizkaia.) When I asked about her intentions for the summer, Lydia was really excited to share with me her plans of going to the different Basque festivals. She felt extremely optimist about the future of the Basques in America. Goian bego.

Lydia-Victoria-Jausoro“Amuma Lil” at the San Inazio Festival. (Boise, Idaho. July 28th.)

On July 19th I travelled to San Francisco, where I met my very good friends of the Basque Cultural Center and the Basque Educational Organization. On this occasion, I participated at their Basque Film Series Night, by presenting “Basque Hotel” (directed by Josu Venero, 2011). 2014 will mark the 10th anniversary of Basque movie night, one of the most popular initiatives in the Basque calendar of the San Francisco Bay Area.

Bidaurreta-Anchustegui-Oiarzabal-EspinalBEOWith Basque Educational Organization directors Franxoa Bidaurreta, Esther Anchustegui Bidaurreta, and Marisa Espinal. (Basque Cultural Center, South San Francisco. July 19th. Photo courtesy of Philippe Acheritogaray.)

This summer marked my first time in the United States, twelve years ago. I have been very fortunate to experience, at first hand, the different ways that Basques and Basque-Americans enjoy and celebrate their heritage. From an institutional level, the cultural, recreational and educational organizations (NABO and its member clubs) display a wide array of initiatives that enrich the American society at large, while private ventures flourish around Basque culture: art designs (Ahizpak), photography (Argazki Lana), genealogy (The Basque Branch), imports (Etcheverry Basque Imports, The Basque Market), music (Noka, Amuma Says No), books (Center for Basque Studies), news (EuskalKazeta)… A new Basque America is born.

Eskerrik asko bihotz bihotzez eta ikusi arte.

On a personal note, our Basque blogosphere keeps growing…

Chico-Oiarzabal-ChiramberroWith Basque fellow bloggers “Hella Basque” (Anne Marie Chiramberro) and “A Basque in Boise” (Henar Chico). (Boise, Idaho. July 28th.)

[Except where otherwise noted, all photographs by Pedro J. Oiarzabal]

Creative_Commons

Your email:

 

Nosotros, Bilbao

  • Menéame0

Luna de aquel Bilbao… allí vivió el amor… cuantos recuerdos… llevo aquí adentro… sé que les vuelvo a contar siempre el mismo cuento, pero no habrá un lugar donde una pueda estar tocando el más allá, como el Bilbao

Bertolt Brecht y Kurt Weill (Canción de Bilbao, 1929)

En estos tiempos donde siempre hay alguien que irremediablemente se empeña en sembrar sombras que se cuelan en nuestros sueños de ciudad improvisada; igualmente, digo, hay quienes imaginaron e imaginan otras geografías posibles iluminadas por destellos deletreados que dejan a las sombras vencidas, mientras perfilan coordenadas de compromiso y esperanza. Ayer fueron Juan, Blas, Gabriel o Ángela y muchos otros… hoy… bien podrían ser Mikel, Santi o Iván y otros muchos.

Mikel Varas (Bilbao, 1980)

“Cada instante, algo se quiebra y, situado entre la luz y el vacío, crea la sombra y hace que la luz tenga sentido… Me sirvo de la luz y de las sombras para escribir palabras en el aire, para que los pájaros puedan leerlas” (Artista).

Un Sol cabizbajo

borra mi silencio.

Un tumulto.

Un problema.

Una risa.

Un sollozo

pero solo en el ojo derecho.

El otro está cansado.

Se acostumbró a vivir…

A vivir llorando.

(Poema “Abando 5 a.m.”, Mikel Varas ©).

pale-agur-Mikel-Varas

(Escultura “Agur”, de la Serie “Madera de Ciudad”, Mikel Varas ©).

Santi Pérez Isasi (Bilbao, 1978)

“Ahora me voy… Pero me quedo… Un bilbaíno nunca se aleja mucho de Bilbao, por muy lejos que vaya; un bilbaíno nunca es más bilbaíno que cuando está lejos de Bilbao. Bilbao seguirá siendo la ciudad de mi infancia, de mi familia y de mis amigos” (Dos años ya).

Una vez que estaba especialmente aburrido, o especialmente inspirado, no lo sé, decidí matarme. No suicidarme, que es una cosa tremendamente vulgar y que ya se ha hecho miles de veces, sino matarme como si matase a otra persona; matar a Santi Pérez Isasi, no a mí; no yo a mí mismo sino… bueno, eso.

Así que empecé a hacer las cosas que creo que haría si quisiera matar a otra persona. Primero, para disimular empecé a tratarme especialmente bien a mí mismo. Me llevaba a cenar a sitios caros; me acompañaba de librerías (aunque todo el mundo sabe que a mí en realidad también me gusta ir de librerías); me daba masajes en la espalda, en los pies, en las piernas… Sobre las cosas que me hacía a mí mismo en otras áreas prefiero no hablar.

Una vez conseguida mi confianza, empecé a llevar la cuenta de mis hábitos. Lamentablemente, pronto descubrí que Santi Pérez Isasi es una persona de pocos hábitos: es imposible saber a qué hora va a salir de casa, ir a trabajar o bajar a tomarse un café. Maldita vida sin horarios…

De manera que mi mejor opción de cogerme desprevenido era esperarme a la puerta de casa un día que hubiera salido… [cont.]

(Fragmento de “Matar a Santi Pérez Isasi”, Santi Pérez Isasi ©).

Iván Repila (Bilbao, 1978)

“Si quedara un solo hombre o una sola mujer sobre la Tierra, seguiría soñando. No tengo ninguna duda. Si quedaran dos, el primero le contaría el sueño al segundo” (Entrevista).

—¿Y qué crees que encontrarás al final?

—No me importa. Quizá haya un castigo, o una recompensa. Quizá haya dolor, nada más que dolor, un dolor tan blanco que me deje ciego. Me da igual. La vida es maravillosa, pero vivir es insoportable. Yo quiero acotar la existencia. Pronunciar durante un siglo una larga y única palabra, y que ella fuera mi verdadero testamento.

—¿Un testamento para quién?

—Para quienes puedan entenderlo.

—¿Crees que seré recordado?, pregunta el Pequeño.

—Quizá por tus contemporáneos, por tu generación, responde el Pequeño.

—Eso no es suficiente. No sé si pertenezco a alguna generación: ninguno de mis seres queridos tiene mi edad. Seré recordado por todos, hasta que no quede un solo hombre sobre la tierra.

—¿Y por qué habrías de serlo? [cont.]

(Fragmento de “El niño que robó el Caballo de Atila”, Iván Repila ©).

Mikel, Santi e Iván nos invitan a explorar una nueva cartografía de vocales y consonantes. Florecen nuevas letras en la ciudad de titanio con una clara voluntad de futuro y de acción, con libertad de estilo, imaginativa y comprometida.

Llego la primavera y pronto el verano, y los casi tres años transcurridos desde que Sergio nos dejó bien podrían haber sido tan solo tres interminables segundos que se funden en abrazos en el despertar de la noche. “Hacia la luna he de volar sobre ella, serpiente azul con mil ojos que adora el fondo que en su noche sueña en calma. Hasta entonces la observo en una estrella, vigilo por si vuela a cada hora y así no pierda Bilbao lo que es su alma”. Nuestro Bilbao.

Creative_Commons

Your email:

 

Recap: Volume II, 2012

  • Menéame0

The year 2012 marked the 75th anniversary of the evacuation of thousands of Basque children as a result of one of the darkest periods in European contemporary history—i.e., the Spanish Civil War. Its consequences in Basque soil were shattering, particularly for the civil society and its children. In 1937, over thirty small towns and villages in Bizkaia were intentionally bombarded by Generalissimo Francisco Franco´s Nazi allies to demoralize the Basque resistance. This provoked a massive organized departure of its youngest population. Some of the children were exiled to the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, having to endure, also, the outbreak of World War II. Many of them even enlisted in the Red Army (“No place for children,” March post).

Some of the children´s testimonies were collected in an oral history video—“Gure Bizitzen Pasarteak—Fragments of our Lives”—as part of an ongoing project that also took me to the land of the Basques in the United Sates (“#EuskalWest2012,” September post). The research attempts to uncover the lives of Basque migrants and exiles who had returned to the Basque Country as a way to make sense of the “injured” collective memory of an entire generation, which, undoubtedly, needs to be healed by acknowledging their sacrifice and suffering (“Mundos invisibles”—“Invisible worlds,” November post).

America was quite present in the blog throughout the year. It is well known the historical significance of this continent for the Basques as it has become a second home for hundreds of years, weaving a tight web of emotional geographies (“Etxea”—“Home,” April post). It is also known, to a certain extent, the relevance of some of the Basque migrants and descendants in the history of their countries of residence as in the cases of Julián Irízar (Argentina) and Jean Esponda (United States). Basque-Argentinian Lieutenant Commander Irízar led a successful rescued expedition in 1903 to the Antarctica, which also became the first official voyage of Argentina to the continent. One of the islands in the Antarctic Argentine Islands was named in his honor (“The Irízar Island,” February post). On the other hand, Johnson County, Wyoming, designed a flag to commemorate the State Fair´s 100th anniversary, which depicts the Ikurriña or Basque flag in order to honor the county´s Basque origins. This goes back to the arrival of Jean Esponda in 1902 from the Old Country. The Johnson County´s flag is the first official Basque flag outside the European homeland (“The Flag,” August post).

Also, we commemorated the 100th anniversary of the Basque Fellowship Society “Euskal Erria” (Sociedad de Confraternidad Vasca) from Montevideo (Uruguay), the Basque Center Zazpirak-Bat from Rosario (Argentina), and the Basque Home (Euzko Etxea) from Santiago de Chile (Chile). These diaspora associations as many others worldwide are good examples of tenacity and steadiness (“ehun”—“100,”May post; “En nuestro propio mundo”—“In our own world”, June post, respectively).

Similar to last year, the most visited post also happened to refer to politics (“Tiempo de promesas”—“Time for promises,” October post). In the occasion of the elections to the Parliament of the Basque Autonomous Community, I attempted to explain the reasons behind the traditional low participation of diaspora Basques, and the importance, in my opinion, for the diaspora to be involved in homeland politics. It is there where diaspora politics are designed and shaped. It is there where the voices of the Basques abroad need to be heard.

Confronted with one of the most acute crisis that recent generations have witnessed, let´s remember Viktor Frankl´s— a Holocaust survivor—words, “When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves.” Indeed, new but difficult times are ahead of us (“Tiempos nuevos”—“New times,” December post).

In June, Basque Identity 2.0, celebrated its 3rd anniversary. Special thanks to our colleagues from eitb.com, A Basque in Boise, and About the Basque Country for their continuous support.

Thank you all for being there. I would love to hear from you. Happy New Year!

Eskerrik asko eta Urte berri on!

(NOTE: Please feel free to use Google automatic translation service…it seems to have improved, just a little bit).

Creative_Commons

Your email:

 


Mundos invisibles

  • Menéame0

“Somos la memoria que tenemos y la responsabilidad que asumimos, sin memoria no existimos y sin responsabilidad quizá no merezcamos existir”

José Saramago (Cuadernos de Lanzarote, 1997)

Ante el relativo grado de desconocimiento de la sociedad actual—particularmente de las generaciones más jóvenes—sobre el hecho de la emigración vasca, y ante la inevitable desaparición de la última generación histórica de emigrantes y exiliados y de aquellos que en su día retornaron, desde la iniciativa Bizkailab de la Universidad de Deusto nos propusimos realizar un estudio urgente sobre la memoria e historia del país, empezando por el Territorio Histórico de Bizkaia. La finalidad era, y sigue siendo, la de entender y difundir la identidad y cultura de un colectivo, a través del testimonio oral de sus protagonistas—tanto de aquellos que en su día emigraron como de los que regresaron—que hasta cierto punto, a día de hoy, permanece relegado al olvido.

oletaAustraliar-haCelebración del tradicional encuentro anual vasco-australiano en su vigesimocuarto aniversario, Oleta (Bizkaia). Fila superior: Mario Satika, Begoña Barrutia, Koldo Goitia, Maribi San Antonio, José Badiola, Iñaki Etxabe y Anne Etxabe. Fila inferior: Mila Aboitiz, Mila Aberasturi, José Ignacio Etxabe y Angelita Fundazuri (Fotografía de Pedro J. Oiarzabal).

Durante meses, hemos tenido la oportunidad de conocer “mundos invisibles”, hilvanados por memorias de otros tiempos, que se entrelazan con las de miles y miles de vascos que por una razón u otra tuvieron que abandonar Euskal Herria, y que en algunos casos, tras décadas en el extranjero, decidieron regresar a su hogar. ¿Qué es lo que quedaba del hogar? ¿Cómo fueron recibidos a su regreso? ¿Qué fue de aquellos vascos que regresaron tras la larga noche del franquismo, tras las interminables jornadas cortando caña de azúcar en Australia o en la soledad más absoluta pastoreando en las colinas del Oeste Americano? ¿Qué ha sido de su historia, de nuestra historia colectiva, del patrimonio cultural inmaterial que conforman los miles de fotogramas que compone la historia más gráfica de la emigración y del retorno a Euskal Herria?

¿Quién no conoce a algún familiar, lejano o no, o ha oído hablar de un vecino o un amigo que probó fortuna como cesta-puntista en el Oriente o en las Américas; de un exiliado; de un pastor; de un cortador de caña; de un hijo o hija de aquellos que se fueron para no volver más? Amerikanuak, Australianuak, Venezolanos, Argentinos, Uruguayos…vascos y vascas con acentos e historias sin contar que conviven entre nosotros y que comparten culturas, lenguas, vivencias de emigración y experiencias de retorno—unas más felices que otras, no carentes de incomprensiones mutuas, y a veces incluso de rechazo. Conforman mundos que nos transportan a otros tiempos y espacios, mundos invisibles, virtualmente desconocidos, pero reales. Sus historias son indispensables para comprender nuestro pasado y nuestro presente como un pueblo abierto al mundo.

ArrosaAmerikanuak20122-haEncuentro anual de los Amerikanuak, Arrosa (Nafarroa Beherea). De izquierda a derecha Jean Luis Oçafrain, Gratien Oçafrain y Michel Duhalde; emigrantes retornados de Estados Unidos (Fotografía de Pedro J. Oiarzabal).

El estudio nos llevó a recorrer numerosas localidades del país y nos acercó a paisajes del Oeste Vasco-Americano, pudiendo realizar más de 46 horas de grabación a personas cuyas vidas les condujo a más de 12 países en América, Asia, Europa y Oceanía. Hoy en día, la historia de Euskal Herria se enriquecería aun más si cabe incorporando las páginas sueltas escritas por vascos y vascas en lugares tan dispares como North Queensland, Idaho, Nevada, Buenos Aires, Caracas, Montevideo, México D.F., Filipinas, Cuba, Yakarta y un largo etcétera. Añadamos esas páginas al libro de nuestra historia y démoslas a conocer. Apenas hemos empezado a vislumbrar las raíces profundas del fenómeno de la emigración, y sobre todo del retorno, que existen en nuestra sociedad, y de su significado histórico en relación al progreso y al bienestar que a día de hoy disfrutamos, y que es en cierta medida, también gracias a los sacrificios y esfuerzos de aquellos que tuvieron que abandonar su tierra.

El vídeo “Gure Bizitzen Pasarteak: Erbeste, Emigrazio eta Itzulera Bizkaira—Fragmentos de Nuestras Vidas: Exilio, Emigración y Retorno a Bizkaia” muestra una selección de entrevistas realizadas en 2012 a vascos que en su momento fueron refugiados, exiliados, emigrantes y que a día de hoy han regresado al país. Nos relatan con sus propias palabras sus historias de vida, entremezclándose los discursos y testimonios más racionales con los más profundos y emotivos.

video2

Es ahora más que nunca necesaria la implicación de la sociedad, sus instituciones y agentes sociales, y de modo especial la de la población emigrante, la retornada y sus familiares para que se constituyan en agentes activos y participes en la propia reconstrucción del fenómeno histórico emigratorio vasco. Tal y como dijo, en su día, el Premio Nobel de Literatura José Saramago “hay que recuperar, mantener y transmitir la memoria histórica, porque se empieza por el olvido y se termina en la indiferencia”.

[Si nació en Bizkaia y por cualquier motivo decidió emigrar a cualquier parte del mundo, y ha regresado a Euskadi, escribanos a bizkaia.retorno@gmail.com Por el contrario si conoce a alguien que emigró y ha regresado hágale llegar este mensaje. Eskerrik asko!]

Creative_Commons

Your email:

 

Tiempo de promesas

  • Menéame0

“Las promesas son olvidadas por los príncipes, nunca por el pueblo”

Giuseppe Mazzini (1805-1872)

Aquellos vascos de la diáspora que han optado por participar con su voto en las sucesivas elecciones al Parlamento de la Comunidad Autónoma de Euskadi lo han hecho de forma muy coincidente en su preferencia política a la de sus conciudadanos residentes en el país. Sin embargo, mientras, por ejemplo, en las elecciones al Parlamento Vasco de 2009 casi un 65% de las personas residentes en Euskadi con derecho al voto lo ejercieron, en la diáspora el porcentaje no llegaba al 16. Lo que es evidente es que todo voto tiene su relevancia, aunque ésta sea muy relativa. En una clara disputa entre el Partido Socialista (PSE-EE PSOE) y Eusko Alkartasuna (EA) por el designio de un asiento parlamentario por la provincia de Araba, el voto de la diáspora otorgó el escaño al PSE-EE PSOE, facilitando la elección de Patxi López como primer Lehendakari no nacionalista vasco sin necesidad de más apoyo que el de sus compañeros de grupo parlamentario y el de los del Partido Popular (PP).

Según el Censo Electoral de Residentes Ausentes en las elecciones al Parlamento de Euskadi del próximo 21 de octubre de 2012 podrán votar 56.640 electores residentes en el extranjero con municipio de inscripción en Euskadi de un total de 1.718.696 electores. Es decir, el voto de la diáspora representa un 3,29% del total del electorado vasco.

Número de electores vascos residentes-ausentes en el extranjero por países con más de 999 electores vascos (Fuente: Instituto Nacional de Estadística, septiembre de 2012).

País de Residencia Nº Electores
FRANCIA

9.979

ARGENTINA

9.740

VENEZUELA

5.378

MÉXICO

5.263

CHILE

3.939

ESTADOS UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA

3.287

REINO UNIDO

3.094

ALEMANIA

1.927

URUGUAY

1.411

SUIZA

1.079

BÉLGICA

1.069

Tal y como muestra la tabla el mayor número de países con más de 999 electores vascos se encuentra en el continente americano, constituyendo un 51,30% del total del electorado vasco en el extranjero. A éste le sigue el electorado residente en países de Europa con un 30,31%.

Según indica la Oficina del Censo Electoral, del total de vascos residentes-ausentes que viven en el extranjero inscritos en Euskadi que podían solicitar el voto por correo para las próximas elecciones vascas, solamente un 11,15% (6.320) de ellos lo han hecho: 3.000 se encuentran inscritos en municipios de Gipuzkoa; 2.767 en municipios de Bizkaia; y 553 en ayuntamientos de Araba. El mayor número de vascos registrados para votar se encuentran en los siguientes países: Francia (2.310), Argentina (759), Reino Unido (397), Alemania (366), y Estados Unidos (334). Esto significa que el electorado de la diáspora en relación al total del electorado vasco ha disminuido drásticamente hasta un paupérrimo 0,36%! ¿Desidia, hartazgo con la clase política, falta de compromiso político con el autogobierno vasco, despreocupación por Euskadi…o simplemente el desconocimiento de la implantación del voto “rogado”? Sinceramente no me atrevo a aventurar una respuesta sin disponer de más información. Todo indica que la complejidad del nuevo sistema de voto rogado establecido en 2011 (Ley Orgánica 2011, de 28 de enero)—por el que todo residente-ausente tiene que comunicar personalmente y por escrito su voluntad de votar—ha propiciado que la participación de comunidades emigrantes como la asturiana o la andaluza en sus respectivos comicios autonómicos de 2012 haya caído a mínimos históricos. Por ejemplo, en las elecciones al Parlamento Gallego de marzo de 2009, un 28,7% de gallegos residentes en el extranjero votaron. Con la introducción del voto rogado, un mero 5,9% del electorado de la diáspora gallega va a poder ejercer el derecho de voto en las elecciones al Parlamento Gallego del 21 de octubre.

Como explica la Oficina del Censo Electoral los residentes en el extranjero pueden votar depositando personalmente su voto en el consulado o embajada en la que se encuentre inscrito—entre el 17 y el 19 de octubre—o bien remitiendo su voto por correo certificado a las sedes diplomáticas antes del 16 de octubre. Ahora bien, ¿cuántos de los 6.320 ciudadanos vascos que han solicitado el voto ejercerán tal derecho? ¿Cuántos se abstendrán? ¿Cuántos votos serán nulos o irán en blanco?

En la otra cara de la moneda política de nuestro peculiar mundo, los cuatro grandes partidos de la escena política vasca han tenido en cuenta, aunque con diferente intensidad y empatía, a la diáspora en sus respectivos programas electorales de cara a la cita electoral del 21 de octubre. ¿Dónde queda la sociedad vasca más allá de las fronteras de Euskadi para los partidos políticos que concurren a las elecciones al Parlamento Vasco?

hauteskundeak

Bajo el eslogan “#somos+del51% los que nos sentimos Vascos y Españoles” Antonio Basagoiti, candidato del PP a Lehendakari, aboga por la desaparición de las Delegaciones del Gobierno Vasco en el exterior, sojuzgando toda acción exterior del Gobierno Vasco a la red de embajadas y consulados del Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores del Gobierno de España. Desde el “Estamos en lo que hay que estar. Guk, gure bidea” Patxi López, candidato del PSE-EE PSOE a Lehendakari, promete en su Programa Electoral promover “la Ley del Estatuto de los Vascos en el Exterior, como herramienta que establezca un reconocimiento ordenado de los derechos de la ciudadanía vasca en el mundo y fortalezca su relación con Euskadi. La Ley deberá recoger también una serie de medidas que faciliten el retorno, el acceso a programas educativos, a la asistencia social, a programas sanitarios o de vivienda”. Ambos partidos de ámbito estatal tienen una amplia representación institucional en el extranjero: PP en el Exterior y PSOE en el Mundo.

La coalición Euskal Herria-Bildu (EH-Bildu), formada por la izquierda abertzale y los partidos Aralar, Alernatiba y EA (con presencia institucional en Argentina), se presenta bajo el lema “Soluzioak zure esku. Es tu momento”. En el apartado de Relaciones Exteriores del Programa Electoral marcan entre sus objetivos fundamentales “estrechar los vínculos con la Diáspora Vasca y los países en los que se integra…” Proponen, entre otras iniciativas, elaborar un “Plan Integral de Juventud de la Diáspora”, un “Plan de Fomento de la participación de la mujer en los centros vascos”, y la creación de un “Centro de Estudios sobre la Migración Vasca”. EH-Bildu ha incluso elaborado un video-mensaje de Laura Mintegi, candidata a Lehendakari, dirigido a la diáspora.

Eusko Alderdi Jeltzailea-Partido Nacionalista Vasco (EAJ-PNV) cuenta con la mayor presencia institucional en el extranjero de todos los partidos políticos del ámbito vasco a través de sus históricas Juntas Extraterritoriales de Argentina, Chile, México y Venezuela. Bajo el eslogan “Euskadi Berpiztu. Nuestro Compromiso con Euskadi. Aurrera” el candidato a Lehendakari, Iñigo Urkullu defiende en su Programa Electoral “Compromiso Euskadi” la creación de la red “Global Basque Network” que integre a agentes empresariales en el exterior, las oficinas permanentes y delegaciones del Gobierno Vasco y el mundo asociativo de la diáspora. A su vez se compromete, también, a “reforzar los lazos con la diáspora vasca” con 6 iniciativas: “apoyar a las colectividades y Centros Vascos en el exterior” (por ejemplo, aboga por establecer programas para la formación de las personas jóvenes asociadas a los centros vascos y continuar la recuperación de la memoria histórica de la diáspora); “divulgar la realidad vasca actual en los centros vascos”; promocionar “intercambios juveniles con la diáspora” (por ejemplo, pretende desarrollar un programa de captación de talentos y de promoción de prácticas en empresas vascas entre los jóvenes de los centros vascos repartidos por el mundo); “potenciar las relaciones con las personas vascas en el mundo” a través de la creación de un portal de comunicación en Internet que sirva de relación a todas las personas de origen vasco dispersas por el mundo; “extender la red de centros vascos”; y, finalmente, “desarrollar, con la asistencia, propuesta y colaboración de las colectividades de la diáspora vasca, la política de cooperación y apoyo a los centros, federaciones y a los ciudadanos vascos en el exterior”.

Las elecciones al Parlamento Vasco del 21 de octubre se van a producir en el contexto del fin de la actividad armada de ETA, de la participación de todas las expresiones ideológicas, y de una brutal crisis socio-económica, resultado de un empobrecimiento ético de ciertos sectores de la elite política y financiera. La inclusión de la diáspora vasca en los programas electorales de los principales partidos políticos da cierta normalidad a las relaciones que han de existir entre un país y aquellos de sus ciudadanos que residen en el extranjero. El voto de la diáspora, cuantitativamente hablando, y más aun tras la implantación del voto rogado, no es decisivo en la elección de uno u otro candidato. Quizás por esto, por la falta de un interés partidista en búsqueda de réditos electorales, la voz de la diáspora debe ser más que nunca escuchada y los derechos de los ciudadanos vascos que la conforman protegidos. También ellos, aunque no residan en este momento entre nosotros, son parte de la sociedad vasca—de una sociedad vasca transnacional, abierta y plural. Hoy es tiempo de promesas…

Creative_Commons

Your email:

 

The Flag

  • Menéame0

Johnson County, Wyoming - encompassing the rolling plains of the Old West and the towering peaks of the Bighorn Mountains. It’s a land rich in both history and scenery. A place of sheep herders and cattle barons, renegades and rustlers. Where Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid holed up after their outlaw exploits. Where miners consumed with gold rush fever passed through on the Bozeman Trail. Where some of the most famous Indian battles in American history occurred. And where the Johnson County Cattle War, a rangeland dispute which historians often deem one of the most notorious events in our history, left its mark here in the late 1880s…and that Owen Wister wrote about in his epic American novel, The Virginian.”

(Johnson County, 2012)

Within this grand introduction to the singular history of the Johnson County in the State of Wyoming, surrounded by wild beauty and its frontier origins, lie the story of the Espondas from Baigorri; the Harriets, the Etchemendys, the Urrizagas, and the Caminos from Arnegi; the Iberlins from Banca; the Ansolabeheres, the Iriberrys, and many others. All these Basque pioneers came from the tiny province of Nafarroa Beherea (approximately 511 square mile), in the Department of the Atlantic Pyrenees in France, and with a current population of 28,000 people. On the other hand, Johnson County, established in 1879, and its main city Buffalo, has a population of over 8,500 people on an area of 4,175 square mile.

The history of the Basque presence in the Johnson County begins with the arrival of Jean Esponda in 1902 as reported by Dollie Iberlin and David Romtvedt in their book “Buffalotarrak”. Most Buffalo Basques originated in the village of Baigorri, because Jean Esponda, a successful immigrant from Baigorri, settled in that area of Wyoming. Esponda immigrated into California in 1886 and then moved to Wyoming in 1902, where he set up a thriving sheepherding operation, claiming many Basques from his own natal village and neighboring villages for nearly two decades. Esponda became known as the “King of the Basques”. He passed away in 1936. By the end of the 1960s, Basque sheepmen owned over 250,000 acres (approximately 390 square mile) of Johnson County land, which was about 76% of the land of the entire province of Nafarroa Beherea. According to the United States Census, in 2000 there were only 869 Basque people in Wyoming, being the smallest, but nonetheless vibrant, Basque community in the American West.

basq04111Basque group photograph at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, in Buffalo, Wyoming, in the late 1960s. (Photograph courtesy of the Center for Basque Studies Library, University of Nevada, Reno)

110 years have passed since Jean Esponda set foot in Wyoming, and much of the Basque heritage is still flourishing. It has become part of the social and cultural fabric of Wyoming. In this regard, Johnson County designed a flag to commemorate the State Fair’s 100th anniversary, which depicts the Ikurriña or Basque flag (originally designed in 1894 in Bilbao, Bizkaia) with the county’s seal in the center, as a way to honor the county’s Basque origins. The Johnson County’s “Basque” flag is the first official Basque flag outside the Basque Country, and the first in the nation. Its symbolism will definitely help to preserve and assure the continuity of the Basque history in the State of Wyoming. It will be publicly displayed, for the first time, at the State Fair that is going to be held on August 11-18 in Douglass.

Do you know similar stories to this one?

jo_co_flag The Johnson County, Wyoming “Basque” flag

Creative_Commons

Your email:

 

Etxea

  • Menéame0

En memoria de Gonzalo Melendo Quesada e Iñaki Beti

“Geográficamente, el hogar es determinado lugar de la superficie terrestre. El lugar en que me encuentro es mi “morada”; el lugar donde pienso permanecer es mi “residencia”; el lugar de donde provengo y quiero ir es mi “hogar”. Pero no es sólo el lugar mi casa, mi habitación, mi jardín, mi ciudad. Sino todo lo que representa”

(Alfred Schutz, La Vuelta al Hogar, 1974)

Todo proceso migratorio conlleva una “ganancia” pero también una “pérdida” que afectan a la propia identidad del emigrante tanto en su capacidad de adaptación al nuevo país de acogida como en su capacidad por sobrellevar la separación tanto de los familiares y amigos como de la cultura, lengua y país. ¿Qué representa el hogar tanto para los cientos de miles de emigrantes y exiliados vascos, como para aquellos que retornaron o aquellos otros que permanecieron en el país?

No es de extrañar los intentos por parte de emigrantes, exiliados y sus descendientes por querer construir un nuevo espacio donde recrear un nuevo hogar, ya sea temporal o permanente, en el que revivir lo dejado atrás y lo heredado de generación en generación. Un espacio que articula el pasado y el presente, y que se encuentra a caballo entre el país de sus antepasados y el país donde han crecido sus hijos e hijas. En sí este nuevo hogar aúna ambos mundos temporales entrelazando emocionalmente la casa abandonada por el padre y la creada para los hijos. Hogares que se multiplican en cada una de las vivencias de aquellos vascos que salieron de Euskal Herria en búsqueda de un mayor grado de felicidad, libertad o de un deseo de prosperar, formando nuevas geografías emocionales que a día de hoy vertebran las diferentes diásporas vascas.

De esta manera, no es ninguna casualidad encontrarse múltiples referencias al hogar, a la casa o etxea, a la familia, o a la amistad en las propias denominaciones de muchas asociaciones vascas del exterior como por ejemplo Hogar Vasco (Madrid), Danak Anaiak (Todos Hermanos), Euskal Anaitasuna (Fraternidad Vasca), Gure Etxe Maitea (Nuestra Amada Casa), Gure Etxea (Nuestro Hogar; General Belgrano, Buenos Aires), Euzko (Eusko) Etxea (La Casa Vasca; Santiago de Chile), Gure Eusko Tokia (Nuestro Sitio Vasco), Etxe Alai (Hogar Feliz), Txoko Alai (Rincón Feliz; Miami), Eusko Aterpea (El Refugio Vasco), Gure Baserria (Nuestro Caserío); Lagun Onak (Buenos Amigos; Las Vegas), Gure Txoko (Nuestro Rincón; Sídney), Euskal Lagunak (Amigos Vascos), o Txoko Lagunartea (El Rincón del Grupo de Amigos).

DSC05268“Gure Euskal Etxea”. Basque Cultural Center, San Francisco (Fotografía: Pedro J. Oiarzabal).

Y el transcurso del tiempo hace que el sentimiento de pertenencia con respecto al país de adopción pueda extenderse y arraigarse entre aquellos emigrantes que optaron por no marcar en el calendario una fecha definitiva de regreso. Una permanencia que da lugar a diversas formas de sentirse y de entender una identidad entre dos culturas y dos hogares siempre cambiantes, y que a la vez se hacen cercanos y lejanos, y que a la vez son conocidos y extraños. Este es el caso de Gonzalo Melendo, andaluz de Córdoba y vasco de adopción. Fue fundador de la Casa Andaluza de Sestao (1984) y su presidente durante 23 años. Falleció el pasado mes de febrero en Madrid a la edad de 75 años. Su última voluntad fue la de ser enterrado en Sestao, en la tierra en la que vivió felizmente durante décadas.

¿Y cuál fue el hogar para aquellos vascos que regresaron a Euskal Herria?

Por ejemplo, según cuenta Koldo San Sebastián, José Hipólito Amias Foruria, nacido en Ispaster (Bizkaia) en 1876, emigró con la edad de 20 años a Estados Unidos, donde fue pastor en el Condado de Malheur del Estado de Oregón. Tras años de estancia en América decidió regresar. En Ispaster construyó un nuevo hogar, una casa solariega a la que llamó “Oregon”. En  la misma localidad de la comarca de Lea Artibai se alza una casa que lleva por nombre “Nevada”, gemela a la de la familia Amias. En la actualidad, en el Condado de Washoe del Estado de Nevada hay una pequeña carretera que lleva por nombre “Ispaster”…a su lado las calles “Navarra”, “Lesaka”, “Pyrenees”, “Euskera”…nos recuerdan la presencia de aquellos vascos que dejaron de transitar esas tierras tiempo atrás, poniendo fin, quizás, a su aventura en América.

Y para vosotros ¿qué es el hogar? ¿Dónde se encuentra vuestro hogar?

Creative_Commons

Your email:

 

No place for children

  • Menéame0

“A child associated with an armed force or armed group refers to any person below 18 years of age who is, or who has been, recruited or used by an armed force or armed group in any capacity, including but not limited to children, boys and girls, used as fighters, cooks, porters, spies or for sexual purposes. It does not only refer to a child who is taking, or has taken, a direct part in hostilities.”

(Paris Principles and guidelines on children associated with armed forces or armed groups, United Nations, 2007)

The Declaration of the Rights of the Child was adopted by United Nations General Assembly on December 10, 1959. This international norm was followed, three decades later, by the Convention on the Rights of the Child (November 20, 1989)—the first legally binding instrument “to incorporate the full range of human rights—civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights”—and by the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict (May 25, 2000). This protocol “establishes 18 as the minimum age for compulsory recruitment and requires States to do everything they can to prevent individuals under the age of 18 from taking a direct part in hostilities.” It entered into force on February 12, 2002, marking the International Day against the Use of Child Soldiers. Since then, more than 140 countries have ratified the protocol.

Ounder18-red

As of February 2012, 27 United Nation Member States have not signed or ratified the Optional Protocol, while another 22 have signed but not ratified it. According to the Heidelberg Institute for International Conflict Research 2011 has been the most violent year since World War II, with twenty more wars than in 2010. Currently, it is estimated that tens of thousands of boys and girls under the age of 18 take active part in armed conflicts in at least 15 countries. The children, once again, are powerless to escape from such violence. They are forced to fight or participate somehow “voluntarily” in popular insurrections that have taken place within the context of the Arab Spring, for instance. However, the military use of children is not a new phenomenon and goes hand by hand, almost inevitably, with our tragic history of human self-destruction. This was the case of some of the children caught at the outbreak of the war between Adolf Hitler’s Germany and Joseph Stalin’s Russia in June 1941. The children had previously been evacuated from Spain—immersed in a fratricide war—to Russia.

It is estimated that 30,000 Spanish children were evacuated during the Spanish Civil War, and 70,000 more left after the end of the war in 1939. Among them 25,000 Basque children went also into exile. Most of the children were temporarily sent to France, Belgium, the United Kingdom, the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics as well as Switzerland, Mexico, and Denmark. They became, and are still, known as “los niños de la guerra” (“the war children”) and the “Gernika Generation,” in the specific Basque case.

Between March 1937 and October 1938 nearly 3,000 children, between 5 and 12 years old, were evacuated from Spain to then the Soviet Union in four expeditions. Most of the children were from the Basque Country (between 1,500 and over 1,700), and Asturias and Cantabria (between 800 and 1,100). In the majority of the cases their parents were sympathetic to the anarchist, socialist, and communist ideals. On June 12, 1937 over 1,500 children and 75 tutors (teachers, doctors, and nurses) left the Port of Santurtzi in the Basque province of Bizkaia on board of the ship “Habana.”

From the moment of the children’s arrival to the German invasion of Russia they lived in good care in the so-called “Infant Homes for the Spanish Children.” There were 11 homes located in the current Russian Federation—including 1 in Moscow and 2 nearby Leningrad—and 5 in Ukraine—including 1 in Odessa and another in Kiev. Soon, their lives were, once more, dramatically turned upside-down. The homes had to be evacuated.

ChildrenRussia“The war children” from Spain and tutors, August 1940, Russia (Image source: Sasinka Astarloa Ruano)

During the Siege of Leningrad, the children Celestino Fernández-Miranda Tuñón and Ramón Moreira, both from Asturias, were 16 and 17 years old respectively at the time of enlisting as volunteers to defend the city, while Carmen Marón Fernández, from Bizkaia, worked as a nurse and dug trenches at the age of 16. Over 40 children were killed before they could be evacuated in 1943. It is considered the longest and most destructive city blockade in history. It resulted in the deaths of 1.5 million people and in the evacuation of 1.4 million civilians.

The survivors of Leningrad together with the rest of the children were taken to remote areas such as today’s republics of Georgia and Uzbekistan, and Saratov Oblast in southern Russia. It is during this time when it is reported that some children were victims of sexual assaults and exploitation, and a few of them ended up in delinquent gangs in order to survive.

ChildrenClassParamilitary training in one of the children’s colony. Shooting practices were a norm in many of the homes (Image source: Spanish Citizenship Abroad Portal)

According to the Spanish Center of Moscow, over 100 “niños de la guerra” voluntarily enlisted in the Red Army, while many others had to carry out some type of work to support the war efforts alongside their schooling time. For instance, Begoña Lavilla and Antonio Herranz, both from Santurtzi, worked at an arms factory in Saratov at the age of 13 and 14, respectively. Eight of the Basque niños—six of them from the “Kiev home”—entered in combat after receiving flight training courses in a military academy. It has been said that some of the children were able to pass themselves off as older men such as Luis Lavín Lavín who was just 15 years old at the time. The eight young Basques were Ignacio Aguirregoicoa Benito (born in Soraluce in 1923), Ramón Cianca Ibarra, José Luis Larrañaga Muniategui (born in Eibar in 1923), the aforementioned Luis Lavín Lavín (born in Bilbao in 1925), Antonio Lecumberri Goikoetxea (born in 1924), Eugenio Prieto Arana (born in Eibar in 1922), Tomás Suárez, and Antonio Uribe Galdeano (born in Barakaldo in 1920). Larrañaga, Uribe, and Aguirregoicoa died in 1942 (Ukraine), 1943 (Dnieper), and 1944 (Estonia), respectively. Aguirregoicoa took his own life in order to avoid being captured by the enemy.

Between 207 and 215 Spaniards were killed as active combatants at the Eastern Front of World War II (also known as the Great Patriotic War; June 22, 1941-May 9, 1945), while another 211 people died of extreme starvation, disease, and the intensive bombardments. According to Lavín, 50 of the enlisted “children” out of a total of 130 were killed during the war.

After two long decades of exile, the first convoy of “children” was allowed to return to Francisco Franco’s Spain in 1957. As of 2012, it is estimated that 170 “niños de la guerra,” all of them over 80 years old, live in the former Soviet Union. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the bombings of Basque cities and villages and the evacuation of their children—fatidic preamble to World War II.

For more information see the interview (in Spanish) to Mateo Aguirre S.J., on the Democratic Republic of Congo child soldiers’ situation at Alboan’s EiTB Blog; and the Child Soldiers International organization; and Luis Lavín Lavín’s conference of 2007 (in Spanish).

Creative_Commons

Your email: