Tag Archives: Gipuzkoa

#EuskalWest2013

  • Menéame0

In memory of Lydia (Sillonis Chacartegui) Jausoro (1920-2013)

“When he first came to the mountains his life was far away… He climbed cathedral mountains. Saw silver clouds below. Saw everything as far as you can see. And they say that he got crazy once. And he tried to touch the sun…”

John Denver (Rocky Mountain High, 1972)

By the time “Rocky Mountain High” became one of the most popular folk songs in America, the North American Basque Organizations (NABO) was an incipient reality. During a visit to Argentina, Basque-Puerto Rican bibliographer Jon Bilbao Azkarate learnt about the Federation of Basque Argentinean Entities (FEVA in its Spanish acronym), which was established in 1955. Bilbao, through the Center for Basque Studies (the then Basque Studies Program) at the University of Nevada, Reno, was the promoter of a series of encounters among Basque associations and individuals, which led to the establishment of NABO in 1973. Its founding members were the clubs of Bakersfield and San Francisco (California); Ontario (Oregon); Boise (Idaho); Grand Junction (Colorado); and Elko, Ely, and Reno (Nevada).

Following last year’s field trip into the Basque-American memory landscape of migration and settlement throughout the American West, I arrived on time for the celebration of the 40th anniversary of NABO that took place in Elko, Nevada, during the first weekend of July. NABO’s 2013 convention was hosted by the Euzkaldunak Basque club, which coincidentally celebrated the 50th anniversary of its National Basque Festival.

NABO-Convention-2013-ElkoNorth American Basque Organizations’ officers, delegates and guests. (Elko, Nevada. July 5th.) (For further information please read Argitxu Camus’ book on the history of NABO.)

On the last day of the festival, NABO president, Valerie Arrechea, presented NABO’s “Bizi Emankorra” or lifetime achievement award to Jim Ithurralde (Eureka, Nevada) and Bob Goicoechea (Elko) for their significant contribution to NABO. Both men were instrumental in the creation of an embryonic Basque federation back in 1973.

Goicoechea-Arrechea-IthurraldeBob Goicoechea (on the right), Valerie Arrechea, and Jim Ithurralde. (Elko, Nevada, July 7th.)

The main goal of my latest summer trip was to initiate a community-based project, called “Memoria Bizia” (The Living Memory), with the goals of collecting, preserving and disseminating the personal oral recollections and testimonies of those who left their country of birth as well as their descendants born in the United States and Canada. Indeed, we are witnessing how rapidly the last Basque migrant and exile generation is unfortunately vanishing. Consequently, I was thrilled to learn that NABO will lead the initiative. The collaboration and active involvement of the Basque communities in the project is paramount for its success. Can we afford to lose our past as told by the people who went through the actual process of migrating and resettlement? Please watch the following video so that you may get a better idea of what the NABO Memoria Bizia project may look like.

This video “Gure Bizitzen Pasarteak—Fragments of our lives” was recorded in 2012, and it shows a selection of interviews conducted with Basque refugees, exiles and emigrants that returned to the Basque Country. The video is part of a larger oral history research project at the University of Deusto.

While being at the Center for Basque Studies in Reno, the road took me to different Basque gatherings in Elko, San Francisco, and Boise.

Basque-Library-RenoBasque Studies Library sign outside the Knowledge Center, University of Nevada, Reno. Established in the late 1960s, the Basque library is the largest repository of its kind outside Europe.

Jordan-Valley-Basque-SignOn the US-95 North going through Jordan Valley, Oregon.

During my stay I was lucky to conduct a couple of interviews with two elder Basque-American women. One of them was Lydia Victoria Jausoro, “Amuma Lil,” who sadly passed away on November 14th at the age of 93. Lydia was born in 1920 in Mountain Home (Idaho) to Pablo Sillonis and Julia Chacartegui. Her dad was born in Ispaster in 1881 and her mother in the nearby town of Lekeitio in 1888. Both Pablo and Julia left the Basque province of Bizkaia in 1900 and 1905 respectively. They met in Boise, where they married. Soon after, Lydia’s parents moved to Mountain Home, where she grew up. She had five brothers. Lydia went to the Boise Business University and later on, in 1946, married Louie Jausoro Mallea in Nampa. Lydia and Louie had two daughters, Juliana and Robbie Lou. (Louie was born in 1919 in Silver City (Idaho) and died in 2005 in Boise. His father, Tomás, was from Eskoriatza (Gipuzkoa) and his mother, Tomasa, from Ereño, Bizkaia.) When I asked about her intentions for the summer, Lydia was really excited to share with me her plans of going to the different Basque festivals. She felt extremely optimist about the future of the Basques in America. Goian bego.

Lydia-Victoria-Jausoro“Amuma Lil” at the San Inazio Festival. (Boise, Idaho. July 28th.)

On July 19th I travelled to San Francisco, where I met my very good friends of the Basque Cultural Center and the Basque Educational Organization. On this occasion, I participated at their Basque Film Series Night, by presenting “Basque Hotel” (directed by Josu Venero, 2011). 2014 will mark the 10th anniversary of Basque movie night, one of the most popular initiatives in the Basque calendar of the San Francisco Bay Area.

Bidaurreta-Anchustegui-Oiarzabal-EspinalBEOWith Basque Educational Organization directors Franxoa Bidaurreta, Esther Anchustegui Bidaurreta, and Marisa Espinal. (Basque Cultural Center, South San Francisco. July 19th. Photo courtesy of Philippe Acheritogaray.)

This summer marked my first time in the United States, twelve years ago. I have been very fortunate to experience, at first hand, the different ways that Basques and Basque-Americans enjoy and celebrate their heritage. From an institutional level, the cultural, recreational and educational organizations (NABO and its member clubs) display a wide array of initiatives that enrich the American society at large, while private ventures flourish around Basque culture: art designs (Ahizpak), photography (Argazki Lana), genealogy (The Basque Branch), imports (Etcheverry Basque Imports, The Basque Market), music (Noka, Amuma Says No), books (Center for Basque Studies), news (EuskalKazeta)… A new Basque America is born.

Eskerrik asko bihotz bihotzez eta ikusi arte.

On a personal note, our Basque blogosphere keeps growing…

Chico-Oiarzabal-ChiramberroWith Basque fellow bloggers “Hella Basque” (Anne Marie Chiramberro) and “A Basque in Boise” (Henar Chico). (Boise, Idaho. July 28th.)

[Except where otherwise noted, all photographs by Pedro J. Oiarzabal]

Creative_Commons

Your email:

 

Tiempo de promesas

  • Menéame0

“Las promesas son olvidadas por los príncipes, nunca por el pueblo”

Giuseppe Mazzini (1805-1872)

Aquellos vascos de la diáspora que han optado por participar con su voto en las sucesivas elecciones al Parlamento de la Comunidad Autónoma de Euskadi lo han hecho de forma muy coincidente en su preferencia política a la de sus conciudadanos residentes en el país. Sin embargo, mientras, por ejemplo, en las elecciones al Parlamento Vasco de 2009 casi un 65% de las personas residentes en Euskadi con derecho al voto lo ejercieron, en la diáspora el porcentaje no llegaba al 16. Lo que es evidente es que todo voto tiene su relevancia, aunque ésta sea muy relativa. En una clara disputa entre el Partido Socialista (PSE-EE PSOE) y Eusko Alkartasuna (EA) por el designio de un asiento parlamentario por la provincia de Araba, el voto de la diáspora otorgó el escaño al PSE-EE PSOE, facilitando la elección de Patxi López como primer Lehendakari no nacionalista vasco sin necesidad de más apoyo que el de sus compañeros de grupo parlamentario y el de los del Partido Popular (PP).

Según el Censo Electoral de Residentes Ausentes en las elecciones al Parlamento de Euskadi del próximo 21 de octubre de 2012 podrán votar 56.640 electores residentes en el extranjero con municipio de inscripción en Euskadi de un total de 1.718.696 electores. Es decir, el voto de la diáspora representa un 3,29% del total del electorado vasco.

Número de electores vascos residentes-ausentes en el extranjero por países con más de 999 electores vascos (Fuente: Instituto Nacional de Estadística, septiembre de 2012).

País de Residencia Nº Electores
FRANCIA

9.979

ARGENTINA

9.740

VENEZUELA

5.378

MÉXICO

5.263

CHILE

3.939

ESTADOS UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA

3.287

REINO UNIDO

3.094

ALEMANIA

1.927

URUGUAY

1.411

SUIZA

1.079

BÉLGICA

1.069

Tal y como muestra la tabla el mayor número de países con más de 999 electores vascos se encuentra en el continente americano, constituyendo un 51,30% del total del electorado vasco en el extranjero. A éste le sigue el electorado residente en países de Europa con un 30,31%.

Según comenta la Oficina del Censo Electoral, del total de vascos residentes-ausentes que viven en el extranjero inscritos en Euskadi que podían solicitar el voto por correo para las próximas elecciones vascas, solamente un 11,15% (6.320) de ellos lo han hecho: 3.000 se encuentran inscritos en municipios de Gipuzkoa; 2.767 en municipios de Bizkaia; y 553 en ayuntamientos de Araba. El mayor número de vascos registrados para votar se encuentran en los siguientes países: Francia (2.310), Argentina (759), Reino Unido (397), Alemania (366), y Estados Unidos (334). Esto significa que el electorado de la diáspora en relación al total del electorado vasco ha disminuido drásticamente hasta un paupérrimo 0,36%! ¿Desidia, hartazgo con la clase política, falta de compromiso político con el autogobierno vasco, despreocupación por Euskadi…o simplemente el desconocimiento de la implantación del voto “rogado”? Sinceramente no me atrevo a aventurar una respuesta sin disponer de más información. Todo indica que la complejidad del nuevo sistema de voto rogado establecido en 2011 (Ley Orgánica 2011, de 28 de enero)—por el que todo residente-ausente tiene que comunicar personalmente y por escrito su voluntad de votar—ha propiciado que la participación de comunidades emigrantes como la asturiana o la andaluza en sus respectivos comicios autonómicos de 2012 haya caído a mínimos históricos. Por ejemplo, en las elecciones al Parlamento Gallego de marzo de 2009, un 28,7% de gallegos residentes en el extranjero votaron. Con la introducción del voto rogado, un mero 5,9% del electorado de la diáspora gallega va a poder ejercer el derecho de voto en las elecciones al Parlamento Gallego del 21 de octubre.

Como explica la Oficina del Censo Electoral los residentes en el extranjero pueden votar depositando personalmente su voto en el consulado o embajada en la que se encuentre inscrito—entre el 17 y el 19 de octubre—o bien remitiendo su voto por correo certificado a las sedes diplomáticas antes del 16 de octubre. Ahora bien, ¿cuántos de los 6.320 ciudadanos vascos que han solicitado el voto ejercerán tal derecho? ¿Cuántos se abstendrán? ¿Cuántos votos serán nulos o irán en blanco?

En la otra cara de la moneda política de nuestro peculiar mundo, los cuatro grandes partidos de la escena política vasca han tenido en cuenta, aunque con diferente intensidad y empatía, a la diáspora en sus respectivos programas electorales de cara a la cita electoral del 21 de octubre. ¿Dónde queda la sociedad vasca más allá de las fronteras de Euskadi para los partidos políticos que concurren a las elecciones al Parlamento Vasco?

hauteskundeak

Bajo el eslogan “#somos+del51% los que nos sentimos Vascos y Españoles” Antonio Basagoiti, candidato del PP a Lehendakari, aboga por la desaparición de las Delegaciones del Gobierno Vasco en el exterior, sojuzgando toda acción exterior del Gobierno Vasco a la red de embajadas y consulados del Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores del Gobierno de España. Desde el “Estamos en lo que hay que estar. Guk, gure bidea” Patxi López, candidato del PSE-EE PSOE a Lehendakari, promete en su Programa Electoral promover “la Ley del Estatuto de los Vascos en el Exterior, como herramienta que establezca un reconocimiento ordenado de los derechos de la ciudadanía vasca en el mundo y fortalezca su relación con Euskadi. La Ley deberá recoger también una serie de medidas que faciliten el retorno, el acceso a programas educativos, a la asistencia social, a programas sanitarios o de vivienda”. Ambos partidos de ámbito estatal tienen una amplia representación institucional en el extranjero: PP en el Exterior y PSOE en el Mundo.

La coalición Euskal Herria-Bildu (EH-Bildu), formada por la izquierda abertzale y los partidos Aralar, Alernatiba y EA (con presencia institucional en Argentina), se presenta bajo el lema “Soluzioak zure esku. Es tu momento”. En el apartado de Relaciones Exteriores del Programa Electoral marcan entre sus objetivos fundamentales “estrechar los vínculos con la Diáspora Vasca y los países en los que se integra…” Proponen, entre otras iniciativas, elaborar un “Plan Integral de Juventud de la Diáspora”, un “Plan de Fomento de la participación de la mujer en los centros vascos”, y la creación de un “Centro de Estudios sobre la Migración Vasca”. EH-Bildu ha incluso elaborado un video-mensaje de Laura Mintegi, candidata a Lehendakari, dirigido a la diáspora.

Eusko Alderdi Jeltzailea-Partido Nacionalista Vasco (EAJ-PNV) cuenta con la mayor presencia institucional en el extranjero de todos los partidos políticos del ámbito vasco a través de sus históricas Juntas Extraterritoriales de Argentina, Chile, México y Venezuela. Bajo el eslogan “Euskadi Berpiztu. Nuestro Compromiso con Euskadi. Aurrera” el candidato a Lehendakari, Iñigo Urkullu defiende en su Programa Electoral “Compromiso Euskadi” la creación de la red “Global Basque Network” que integre a agentes empresariales en el exterior, las oficinas permanentes y delegaciones del Gobierno Vasco y el mundo asociativo de la diáspora. A su vez se compromete, también, a “reforzar los lazos con la diáspora vasca” con 6 iniciativas: “apoyar a las colectividades y Centros Vascos en el exterior” (por ejemplo, aboga por establecer programas para la formación de las personas jóvenes asociadas a los centros vascos y continuar la recuperación de la memoria histórica de la diáspora); “divulgar la realidad vasca actual en los centros vascos”; promocionar “intercambios juveniles con la diáspora” (por ejemplo, pretende desarrollar un programa de captación de talentos y de promoción de prácticas en empresas vascas entre los jóvenes de los centros vascos repartidos por el mundo); “potenciar las relaciones con las personas vascas en el mundo” a través de la creación de un portal de comunicación en Internet que sirva de relación a todas las personas de origen vasco dispersas por el mundo; “extender la red de centros vascos”; y, finalmente, “desarrollar, con la asistencia, propuesta y colaboración de las colectividades de la diáspora vasca, la política de cooperación y apoyo a los centros, federaciones y a los ciudadanos vascos en el exterior”.

Las elecciones al Parlamento Vasco del 21 de octubre se van a producir en el contexto del fin de la actividad armada de ETA, de la participación de todas las expresiones ideológicas, y de una brutal crisis socio-económica, resultado de un empobrecimiento ético de ciertos sectores de la elite política y financiera. La inclusión de la diáspora vasca en los programas electorales de los principales partidos políticos da cierta normalidad a las relaciones que han de existir entre un país y aquellos de sus ciudadanos que residen en el extranjero. El voto de la diáspora, cuantitativamente hablando, y más aun tras la implantación del voto rogado, no es decisivo en la elección de uno u otro candidato. Quizás por esto, por la falta de un interés partidista en búsqueda de réditos electorales, la voz de la diáspora debe ser más que nunca escuchada y los derechos de los ciudadanos vascos que la conforman protegidos. También ellos, aunque no residan en este momento entre nosotros, son parte de la sociedad vasca—de una sociedad vasca transnacional, abierta y plural. Hoy es tiempo de promesas…

Creative_Commons

Your email:

 

The Irízar Island

  • Menéame0

“Many hundred dreams have been dreamed in our island but I do not know if they helped to brighten our existence. They grouped themselves around two objects—food and rescue”

(Carl Skottsberg at Paulet Island, 1903)

In the Antarctic Argentine Islands of the Wilhelm Archipelago lies a pretty tiny island called Irízar (65° 13′ 0″ S, 64° 12′ 0″ W). The Argentine Islands are a group of sixteen islands, which were named as such by Jean-Baptiste Charcot—scientific leader of the first French Expedition to Antarctica that took place between 1903 and 1905—in gratitude to the Republic of Argentina. One of the islands was named in honor of Basque-Argentinian Lieutenant Commander Julián Irízar who had previously led the rescue of the failed Swedish Antarctic Expedition in 1903.

map_3031_64_303_400_400The Antarctic Irízar Island (Map source: Australian Antarctic Data Center)

It was the era of the international scientific and geographical exploration of Antarctica, which, in turn, also favored private commercial pursuits (e.g., the whaling industry) and fuelled the feeling of personal adventure by becoming, for example, the first person to reach the geographical South Pole. This era was initiated by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition, sponsored by the Belgian Geographical Society and led by navy officer Adrien de Gerlache in 1897, and it concluded in 1922 with the British Shackleton–Rowett Expedition. This was considered the last significant scientific voyage before the introduction of the aerial exploration in the late 1920s, which opened up a modern era for Antarctic discovery. It also meant the slow end of the maritime voyages of scientific exploration that began in the late 17th century.

During more than two decades sixteen major polar expeditions were launched by Belgium, the United Kingdom, Germany, Sweden, France, Japan, Norway, and Australia. It was some time before the revolution in transport and telecommunications technologies, and all pioneers’ efforts were confronted with the crude hostility of an unknown continent. Many crew members suffered severe injuries and others died under extreme weather conditions, lack of supplies, illnesses, and accidents.

The 1901 expedition led by Swedish scientist Otto Nordenskjöld and Norwegian explorer Carl Anton Larsen soon was about to face the hardships of Antarctica. As part of an agreement with the government of Argentina, military geologist José María Sobral Iturrioz joined the crew of Antartic, the expedition’s steamship. He became the first known Argentinian (and first Argentinian of Basque origin) to live in the southernmost continent of the planet. Nordenskjöld and five of his men were dropped off at Snow Hill Island in 1902 to establish a campsite from where to carry their work for one winter, while Captain Larsen sailed back to Malvinas. In November 1902 Larsen returned for Nordenskjöld and his group, but the ship was crushed by ice and finally sank 25 miles from Paulet Island. Both parties had to spend another isolated winter while ignoring each other’s fate. Their nightmare just began. A young sailor, Ole Christian Wennersgaard died in June 1903.

Concerned about the members of the expedition, Sweden, Argentina and France began to make arrangements for their rescue. Meanwhile, Carlsen’s party managed to reunite with Nordenskjöld’s group at Snow Hill where were successfully rescued by Lieutenant Commander Julián Irízar and its corvette Uruguay in November 1903. On December 2, 1903, the steam relief ship safely arrived at Buenos Aires after dealing with a huge storm that destroyed the mainmast and the foremast. It was greeted by tens of thousands of people. The rescue was considered one of the most triumphant and heroic episodes in the history of Antarctica as echoed by the international press of the day. It was also the first official voyage of Argentina to the frozen continent. Upon return Irízar was promoted to Captain.

Uruguayx10The corvette Uruguay (Photo source: Fundación Histarmar)

Among the 22 members of the Uruguay, the surgeon, José Gorrochategui, was also of Basque ancestry. Irízar and Gorrochategui were the first known Basques or Argentinians of Basque origin who set foot on the Antarctic continent (in addition to Sobral). Sobral Iturrioz was born in Gualeguaychú and Gorrochategui in Concepción del Uruguay, both in the province of Entre Ríos. Irízar was born in Capilla del Señor, in the province of Buenos Aires, in 1869 and died in Buenos Aires in 1935. Gorrochategui’s parents were from the Basque province of Bizkaia—his father was from Bilbao and his mother from Bermeo. Irízar’s parents were also Basque migrants, but this time they were from the province of Gipuzkoa; his father, Juan José Irízar was from Oñati and his mother, Ana Bautista Echeverría from Zumarraga.

On December 10, 1903, the Basque association Laurak-Bat of Buenos Aires organized a banquet to honor Irízar and his crew for the rescue of the Swedish Antarctic Expedition as well as for Sobral Iturrioz. During the ceremony, Irízar and his officers were given a silver-plated copper medal, while the sailors might have received a copper medal. The Basque-language inscription in the silver medal read: “Guidontzi “Uruguay”-ko adintari Julian Irizar Jaunari. Biltoki “Laurak-Bat”-ek” (Obverse); “Joair Doaitea “Antartic”-ari laguntzeko * Buenos Aires 1903 * (Reverse). (“The Center “Laurak-Bat” to Mr. Julian Irizar, captain of the ship “Uruguay” that leaves to help out the “Antarctic” * Buenos Aires 1903 *”).

2-14-2012 001

The banquet at the Laurak-Bat clubhouse (Photo source: La Baskonia, Number 368: 1903).

2-14-2012 (3) 001

The Laurak-Bat Irízar Medal (Images source: La Baskonia, Number 368: 1903). According to Glenn M. Stein, FRGS, polar and maritime historian, “this may very well be the only polar-related medal ever created in the Basque language.

2-14-2012 (4) 001

Irízar became Admiral of the Argentine Navy and retired after 50 years of military service. Through his career Irízar received many distinguished awards including the insignia of Chevalier (Knight) of the Legion of Honor of France. On the 50th anniversary of the rescue, the Argentinian government built a monolith at the Buenos Aires port to commemorate “la hazaña de Irízar” (Irízar’s heroic deed). In 1979, the icebreaker of the Argentina Navy was named Almirante Irízar in his honor. The corvette Uruguay became a naval museum in 1967, and nowadays it is moored to the dock of Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires. The Argentine Antarctic summer base, built in 1965, was named after Lieutenant Sobral, considered the father of Argentinian explorations in Antarctica.

For more information (in Spanish) see: “1903 – Hazaña de la corbeta Uruguay y la colectividad baskongada” (Luis Héctor Carranza, 2003) and “Julian Irizar y la ‘Uruguay’” (Martha González Zaldua, 2003).

Many thanks to Shannon Sisco at the Basque Library, University of Nevada, Reno

88x31

Your email:

 

Zazpiak Bat Dance Group de San Francisco: Paso a paso desde hace 50 años

  • Menéame0

Fundado en Junio de 1960 en San Francisco, California, el Basque Club of California (Club Vasco de California) se convirtió rápidamente en un referente cultural tanto a nivel de las comunidades vascas del estado como a nivel nacional, contribuyendo, por ejemplo, a la creación de la federación de organizaciones vascas de Norte América (NABO) a principios de la década de 1970. En sus orígenes, el Club Vasco de San Francisco estuvo compuesto, en su gran mayoría, por vascos de Nafarroa Beherea y Nafarroa que habían emigrado a Estados Unidos en la década de 1940. Muchos de ellos tras la depresión económica de la Segunda Guerra Mundial decidieron trasladarse de las zonas rurales de California a San Francisco en busca de nuevas oportunidades, rejuveneciendo, de esta manera, a la comunidad vasca de la ciudad.

A día de hoy, varios clubes vascos continúan en activo en California. El decano de las asociaciones es el Kern County Basque Club, establecido en Bakersfield en 1944. A este le sigue el Southern California Basque Club, creado un año después en la localidad de Chino. Habrá que esperar a la década de 1960 para encontrarnos con una nueva hornada de asociaciones: El Club Vasco de California (San Francisco, 1960), Los Banos Basque Club (Los Banos, 1964), y Chino Basque Club (Chino, 1967).

Entre las actividades que tuvieron un mayor y temprano arraigo entre los socios del recién fundado club vasco de San Francisco se encuentra el grupo de danzas Zazpiak Bat Dance Group. Este primer fin de semana de Junio ha marcado el cincuenta aniversario de su primea actuación en público, siendo el grupo de danzas más antiguo de la Bahía de San Francisco. Al grupo de adultos se unió un grupo de danzas para niños llamado Gazteak, la primera banda de klika en el país, Zazpiak Bat Klika (1964), y el primer coro vasco del país, Elgarrekin (1979).

Zazpiak Bat Dance Group 1961

El grupo original de baile Zazpiak Bat en 1961. Sentados en primera fila (de izquierda a derecha): Mayie Camino y Bernadette Iribarren. Sentados segunda fila (de izquierda a derecha): Mayie Oçafrain, Anita Arduain, Christine Uharriet, Denise Ourtiague, Catherine Dunat y Louise Saparart. De pies (de izquierda a derecha): Juan Tellechea, Jeannot Laxague, Michel Duhalde, Michel Arduain, Michel Antoine, Michel Oyharçabal, Pierre Labat, Gratien Oçafrain, Frederic Fuldain y Paul Castech (Cortesía de la Colección Urazandi de San Francisco).

Frederic Fuldain fue el creador tanto del grupo de danzas de adultos—junto al instructor Juan Tellechea, de Lesaka—como de la banda de klika, a la vez que el organizador de los primeros torneos de mus y de pelota del club vasco. Nacido en Bidarrai en 1929, Fuldain emigró a Bakersfield en 1951 donde trabajo como pastor de ovejas durante tres años. De ahí se trasladó a San Francisco donde abrió su propio negocio de jardinería. Fuldain fue el Presidente de Honor del club durante treinta años. Falleció en Belmont, California a la edad de setenta y seis años. La idea original de Fuldain era incluir bailes de las provincias de Bizkaia y Gipuzkoa como complemento a los bailes de la provincia de Nafarroa Beherea—origen de la mayoría de los socios de aquel entonces. Su mano derecha en esta labor fue Tellechea. En los inicios los dantzaris fueron acompañados por el acordeonista Jim Etchepare y los txistularis Juan José y Carmelo San Mames y Abel Bolumburu.

Frederic Fuldain

Ceremonia de homenaje a Frederic Fuldain en el Centro Cultural Vasco de San Francisco el 2 de Abril de 1995 (Cortesía de la Colección Urazandi de San Francisco).

El grupo Gazteak fue creado por Michel Oyharçabal y Christine Maysonnave. En 1962, Pierre Etcharren, de Uharte-Garazi, se convirtió en el instructor del grupo de niños. Dos años después, tras el retorno de Tellechea a Euskal Herria, Etcharren se hizo también cargo del grupo de adultos. Cargo que ocupó durante veinticinco años. Desde entonces su hija, Valerie Etcharren, ha instruido a ambos grupos.

Desde Junio de 1961 hasta hoy, el Zazpiak Bat Dance Group ha actuado por todo el Oeste Americano y se ha consolidado como uno de los grupos de danza vasca más interesantes del país. En 1993 participaron en el Baztandarren Biltzarra de Elizondo bajo la atenta mirada del que fuera su primer instructor Juan Tellechea. Habían transcurrido veintinueve años.

“Euskaldunak Californian”

Dantzaris del Zazpiak Bat en Elizondo, Nafarroa en 1993. Primera fila (de izquierda a derecha): Martin Lasa, Xavier Oçafrain y Xavier Salaburu. Segunda fila (de izquierda a derecha): Idoya Salaburu, Isabelle Oillarburu, Maitexa Cuburu, Jeanette Etchamendy, Evelyne Etcharren, Elise Martinon, Rose Marie Etchamendy y Valerie Etcharren. Fila del fondo (de izquierda a derecha): Elisa Lasa, Isabelle Oçafrain, Valerie Gorostiague, Nicole Oçafrain y Stephanie Duhart (Cortesía de la Colección Urazandi de San Francisco).

Para conmemorar el quincuagésimo aniversario del Zazpiak Bat diferentes generaciones de bailarines van a actuar en el Centro Cultural Vasco de San Francisco durante el fin de semana del 27 y 28 de Agosto de este año. Emigrantes vascos llevaron consigo experiencias, valores, prácticas y tradiciones culturales, religiosas y lingüísticas a Estados Unidos, produciendo su propia interpretación de cultura e identidad vascas. Recrearon una cultura en un nuevo país contra todo pronóstico, siendo capaces de trasmitirla exitosamente a las nuevas generaciones de vascos nacidos en tierra americana. Hoy como hace cincuenta años, la comunidad vasca de San Francisco sigue demostrando la vitalidad y la capacidad de soñar y amar que les llevo a construir una nueva Euskal Herria a miles de kilómetros de distancia de Europa.

88x31

Your email:

 

The Basque Global Time

  • Menéame0

Time present and time past

are both perhaps present in time future,

and time future contained in time past”

(T.S. Eliot, Burnt Norton, Four Quartets, 1945)

Some Basque diaspora communities and some groups in the Basque Country share, depending on the type of celebrations, some highly symbolic temporal commemorations. According to Michel Laguerre, “diasporic new years, holy days, and holidays incubate the memory of the homeland, heighten the temporal dissimilarity between the mainstream and the ethnic enclave, intensify transnational relations, maximize revenues in the diasporic economy…raise the public consciousness about the presence of the group in their midst, induce changes of the diasporic community, and help the group reproduce itself as a transglobal entity” (In Urban Multiculturalism and Globalization in New York City, 2003: 5). That is to say, different temporal commemorations such as religious, cultural, political, and hybrid are currently celebrated by Basques worldwide. However, the boundaries between religious, political, or cultural temporalities are not so clear-cut. For example, religious celebrations, such as Saint Ignatius of Loyola can be understood as strong Basque nationalist events while nationalist events, such as the Aberri Eguna are imbued with religious symbolism; and cultural events such as Korrika, the bi-annual pro-Basque language race are seen as highly political.

Following the Roman Catholic calendar Basque diaspora communities celebrate different religious festivities, such as Christmas, Easter Week, and Basque Patron Saints days (e.g., Saint Sebastian, January 20th—e.g., Madrid—Saint Fermín, July 7th, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, July 31st—e.g., Miami—Our Lady of Arantzazu, September 9th, or Saint Francis Xavier, December 3rd). Despite the obvious religious content of those festivities, for example, Saint Francis Xavier, the Patron Saint of Nafarroa, and Saint Ignatius of Loyola, the Patron Saint of the provinces of Bizkaia and Gipuzkoa, were not only considered religious symbols but also political symbols, particularly during the time of the Basque government-in-exile.

Similarly, Aberri Eguna (the Day of the Homeland) coincides, intentionally, with the Catholic festivity of Easter Sunday, as a metaphor for the resurrection of the Basque nation. It has been, and still is, commemorated in the Basque diaspora (e.g., London and Havana) since the Basque Nationalist Party (PNV in its Spanish acronym) established it in 1932. From 1936 to 1976, the Spanish Workers Socialist Party also commemorated the date, which was legalized in Spain in 1978. Since then, only the Basque nationalist parties, separately, celebrate it. However, since 2005 the annual Aberri Eguna celebration in Argentina were jointly celebrated by representatives from the nationalist youth group JO TA KE of Rosario, the extraterritorial assembly of the PNV in Argentina, and Eusko Alkartasuna-Argentina. In addition, the aerial bombardment of Gernika by Nazi Germany on April 26, 1937, is another highly commemorated date by Basque diaspora institutions and communities (e.g., Argentina and San Francisco, United States).

The main common cultural celebrations refer to the Basque language or Euskara. Euskararen Eguna, the International Basque Language Day, was instituted by Eusko Ikaskuntza, the Society of Basque Studies, in 1948, and it is celebrated on December 3rd, the day of St. Francis Xavier. It has been, and still is, celebrated in the diaspora. The bi-annual and very popular pro-Basque language event Korrika—a run and walk-a-thon to raise money for Basque language schools—is also celebrated abroad (e.g., Barcelona and Shanghai).

In the 2003 World Congress of Basque Collectivities, the institutional representatives of the Basque diaspora recommended the establishment of a “Day of the Diaspora” to be celebrated in both the Basque Country and the diaspora as a way to achieve an official social recognition in the homeland. (Unfortunately, as of April 2011, the “Day of the Diaspora” has not been established yet). Despite the fact that Basque migrants are physically removed from their home country, they are able to be united with their co-nationals by sharing cyclical common events throughout time. The aforementioned celebrations unite Basques from all provinces, including diaspora Basques. These specific temporalities for communal gathering, fraternity, and for renewing pledges of identity, help diaspora and homeland Basques to imagine themselves as a Basque united global community regardless of their geographical location.

Are we ready to build a Basque global community?

For a version of the post in Spanish please visit: http://www.euskonews.com/0578zbk/kosmo57801es.html

88x31

Your email: