Tag Archives: North American Basque Organizations (NABO)

This is not the Basque Country

“All that is solid melts into air, all that is holy is profaned”

                                                                 Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels (The Communist Manifesto, 1848)

Between July 28 and August 2, 2015, the city of Boise (Idaho, United States) will held one of the largest Basque cultural festivals outside the Basque Country, Euskal Herria. It is estimated that more than 30,000 people will attend Jaialdi. This is the story of homeland visitors and alike encountering their fellow people of the diaspora, perhaps, for the first time in their lives. It would be an opportunity to reflect on the meaning of “home” and “homeland” for diasporans’ identity as well as notions of “authenticity” and “cultural (re)production”. Where is the Basque Country in the imagery of those who left their land of origin? Where is “home” for Basque Americans? How the homeland imagines the expatriates as part of their “imagined community”?

jaialdi_postcardHomeland visitors coming to Boise should, if I may, prepare themselves to embrace the many different expressions of Basque identity and culture that will encounter, which may depart from pre-conceived ideas of what Basque culture and identity are as produced at home. Paraphrasing the friendly summer reminder for tourists, posted through many towns across the region, “You are neither in Spain nor in France. You are in the Basque Country,” please remember “Basque America is not the Basque Country” or is it? What do you think?

Athletic Club Bilbao vs Tijuana Xoloitzcuintles de Caliente | Boise Basques | Oinkari Basque Dancers | Biotzetik Basque Choir | Euzkaldunak | Basque Museum and Cultural Center Exhibits | Basque Studies Symposium | Memoria Bizia Meeting | NABO Convention | Ahizpak Designs | Amuma Says No | Gayaldi Boise Edition | The Basque Market | Bar Gernika | Leku Ona | Boiseko Ikastola

For more information, please read “The Open Circle” (at “Diaspora Bizia,” EuskalKultura.com).

Creative_Commons


 

#EuskalWest2013

In memory of Lydia (Sillonis Chacartegui) Jausoro (1920-2013)

“When he first came to the mountains his life was far away… He climbed cathedral mountains. Saw silver clouds below. Saw everything as far as you can see. And they say that he got crazy once. And he tried to touch the sun…”

John Denver (Rocky Mountain High, 1972)

By the time “Rocky Mountain High” became one of the most popular folk songs in America, the North American Basque Organizations (NABO) was an incipient reality. During a visit to Argentina, Basque-Puerto Rican bibliographer Jon Bilbao Azkarreta learnt about the Federation of Basque Argentinean Entities (FEVA in its Spanish acronym), which was established in 1955. Bilbao, through the Center for Basque Studies (the then Basque Studies Program) at the University of Nevada, Reno, was the promoter of a series of encounters among Basque associations and individuals, which led to the establishment of NABO in 1973. Its founding members were the clubs of Bakersfield and San Francisco (California); Ontario (Oregon); Boise (Idaho); Grand Junction (Colorado); and Elko, Ely, and Reno (Nevada).

Following last year’s field trip into the Basque-American memory landscape of migration and settlement throughout the American West, I arrived on time for the celebration of the 40th anniversary of NABO that took place in Elko, Nevada, during the first weekend of July. NABO’s 2013 convention was hosted by the Euzkaldunak Basque club, which coincidentally celebrated the 50th anniversary of its National Basque Festival.

NABO-Convention-2013-ElkoNorth American Basque Organizations’ officers, delegates and guests. (Elko, Nevada. July 5th.) (For further information please read Argitxu Camus’ book on the history of NABO.)

On the last day of the festival, NABO president, Valerie Arrechea, presented NABO’s “Bizi Emankorra” or lifetime achievement award to Jim Ithurralde (Eureka, Nevada) and Bob Goicoechea (Elko) for their significant contribution to NABO. Both men were instrumental in the creation of an embryonic Basque federation back in 1973.

Goicoechea-Arrechea-IthurraldeBob Goicoechea (on the right), Valerie Arrechea, and Jim Ithurralde. (Elko, Nevada, July 7th.)

The main goal of my latest summer trip was to initiate a community-based project, called “Memoria Bizia” (The Living Memory), with the goals of collecting, preserving and disseminating the personal oral recollections and testimonies of those who left their country of birth as well as their descendants born in the United States and Canada. Indeed, we are witnessing how rapidly the last Basque migrant and exile generation is unfortunately vanishing. Consequently, I was thrilled to learn that NABO will lead the initiative. The collaboration and active involvement of the Basque communities in the project is paramount for its success. Can we afford to lose our past as told by the people who went through the actual process of migrating and resettlement? Please watch the following video so that you may get a better idea of what the NABO Memoria Bizia project may look like.

This video “Gure Bizitzen Pasarteak—Fragments of our lives” was recorded in 2012, and it shows a selection of interviews conducted with Basque refugees, exiles and emigrants that returned to the Basque Country. The video is part of a larger oral history research project at the University of Deusto.

While being at the Center for Basque Studies in Reno, the road took me to different Basque gatherings in Elko, San Francisco, and Boise.

Basque-Library-RenoBasque Studies Library sign outside the Knowledge Center, University of Nevada, Reno. Established in the late 1960s, the Basque library is the largest repository of its kind outside Europe.

Jordan-Valley-Basque-SignOn the US-95 North going through Jordan Valley, Oregon.

During my stay I was lucky to conduct a couple of interviews with two elder Basque-American women. One of them was Lydia Victoria Jausoro, “Amuma Lil,” who sadly passed away on November 14th at the age of 93. Lydia was born in 1920 in Mountain Home (Idaho) to Pablo Sillonis and Julia Chacartegui. Her dad was born in Ispaster in 1881 and her mother in the nearby town of Lekeitio in 1888. Both Pablo and Julia left the Basque province of Bizkaia in 1900 and 1905 respectively. They met in Boise, where they married. Soon after, Lydia’s parents moved to Mountain Home, where she grew up. She had five brothers. Lydia went to the Boise Business University and later on, in 1946, married Louie Jausoro Mallea in Nampa. Lydia and Louie had two daughters, Juliana and Robbie Lou. (Louie was born in 1919 in Silver City (Idaho) and died in 2005 in Boise. His father, Tomás, was from Eskoriatza (Gipuzkoa) and his mother, Tomasa, from Ereño, Bizkaia.) When I asked about her intentions for the summer, Lydia was really excited to share with me her plans of going to the different Basque festivals. She felt extremely optimist about the future of the Basques in America. Goian bego.

Lydia-Victoria-Jausoro“Amuma Lil” at the San Inazio Festival. (Boise, Idaho. July 28th.)

On July 19th I travelled to San Francisco, where I met my very good friends of the Basque Cultural Center and the Basque Educational Organization. On this occasion, I participated at their Basque Film Series Night, by presenting “Basque Hotel” (directed by Josu Venero, 2011). 2014 will mark the 10th anniversary of Basque movie night, one of the most popular initiatives in the Basque calendar of the San Francisco Bay Area.

Bidaurreta-Anchustegui-Oiarzabal-EspinalBEOWith Basque Educational Organization directors Franxoa Bidaurreta, Esther Anchustegui Bidaurreta, and Marisa Espinal. (Basque Cultural Center, South San Francisco. July 19th. Photo courtesy of Philippe Acheritogaray.)

This summer marked my first time in the United States, twelve years ago. I have been very fortunate to experience, at first hand, the different ways that Basques and Basque-Americans enjoy and celebrate their heritage. From an institutional level, the cultural, recreational and educational organizations (NABO and its member clubs) display a wide array of initiatives that enrich the American society at large, while private ventures flourish around Basque culture: art designs (Ahizpak), photography (Argazki Lana), genealogy (The Basque Branch), imports (Etcheverry Basque Imports, The Basque Market), music (Noka, Amuma Says No), books (Center for Basque Studies), news (EuskalKazeta)… A new Basque America is born.

Eskerrik asko bihotz bihotzez eta ikusi arte.

On a personal note, our Basque blogosphere keeps growing…

Chico-Oiarzabal-ChiramberroWith Basque fellow bloggers “Hella Basque” (Anne Marie Chiramberro) and “A Basque in Boise” (Henar Chico). (Boise, Idaho. July 28th.)

[Except where otherwise noted, all photographs by Pedro J. Oiarzabal]

Creative_Commons


 

#EuskalWest2012

I woke up as the sun was reddening; and that was the one distinct time in my life, the strangest moment of all, when I didn’t know who I was—I was far away from home…”

Jack Kerouac (“On the Road”, Part 1, Chapter 3, 1957)

Nevada

One summer evening at dusk (Las Vegas, Nevada).

Upon arriving in Reno, Nevada, the memories I thought were gone for good came back quickly…the silhouettes of the mountains, the city lights, the fragrant smell of the sagebrush, and the name of the streets revealed themselves like invisible ink on a white canvas. Time did not temper the sentiments, and past stories did not diminish in size. It is always good to come back, even if it is impossible to return to the point where I left off.

Ainara Puerta, my colleague, and I embarked on a month-and-a-half-long field trip to conduct oral history interviews with Basque emigrants across the American West as part of a larger project called BizkaiLab, which is the result of an agreement between the Provincial Council of Bizkaia and the University of Deusto. The Center for Basque Studies in Reno became our base camp.

CBS

The Center for Basque Studies at the University of Nevada, Reno.

The aim of the project was (and still is) to preserve the rich migrant past of the Basque people for future generations by gathering information from the people who actually migrated and from those who had returned. Their stories travel landscapes of near and distant memories, between then and now, between an old home and a new home, and are invaluable for understanding our past and our present as a common people dispersed throughout the world.

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The Star Hotel, Basque boardinghouse established in 1910 in Elko, Nevada.

Understanding the relevance of preserving the life histories of the oldest members of the different Basque communities in America, the North American Basque Organizations, the Center for Basque Studies, the Basque Museum and Cultural Center, and the University of Deusto came together to organize, in a very short period of time, an oral history workshop to train community members in the interviewing process. This, we believe, is a way forward to empower the communities to regain ownership of their local histories as told by those who lived through the migration and resettlement processes.

Workshop

The Oral History Workshop on Basque immigrants in the U.S. took place at the Basque Museum and Cultural Center (Boise, Idaho). Participants from left to right, Patty A. Miller, Teresa Yragui, Grace Mainvil, Gloria Lejardi, Gina Gridley, Goisalde Jausoro, David Lachiondo, and Izaskun Kortazar.

NABO

The North American Basque Organizations Board of Directors. From left to right: Marisa Espinal (Secretary), Valerie (Etcharren) Arrechea (President), Mary Gaztambide (Vice-president), and Grace Mainvil (Treasurer).

Similarly, the road led us to the Basque Cultural Center where we met the members of the Basque Educational Organization; great friends. Their constant work has turned into successful cultural projects in the San Francisco Bay Area, including the book, “Gardeners of Identity”, which I was honored to author.

SF

The Board of Directors of the Basque Educational Organization at the Basque Cultural Center (South San Francisco, California). From left to right, standing: Ainara Puerta, Marisa Espinal, Aña Iriartborde, Yvonne Hauscarriague, Esther Bidaurreta, Nicole Sorhondo, and Pedro J. Oiarzabal. From left to right, kneeling down: Franxoa Bidaurreta, Mari-José Durquet (guest), and Philippe Acheritogaray. (Photograph courtesy of Philippe Acheritogaray)

By the time our trip was coming to an end we had driven over 4,000 miles (approximately 6.600 kilometers) through the states of California, Idaho, and Nevada in less than thirty days. We gathered over 21 hours of interviews with Basques from Boise, Elko, Henderson, Las Vegas, Reno, and Winnemucca. We conducted ethnographic work in the Basque festivals of Boise, Elko, Reno, and Gardnerville; took hundreds of photographs; attended community meetings; and met with several Basque associations and individuals.

on the road

On the road, Highway 50, “The Loneliest Road in America.”

Since the last time I was in the country many dear friends—some of whom had been key players in their Basque-American communities for decades—had sadly passed away. And yet, I found some comfort when witnessing a new generation of Basques, born in the United States, coming forward to maintain and promote our common heritage. This, in turn, will revitalize the Basque life and social fabric of their communities and institutions.

Boise

Oinkari Basque Dancers at the San Inazio Festival (Boise, Idaho).

Reno

Zazpiak Bat Reno Basque Club dancers preparing for the Basque festival in Elko, Nevada.

Throughout our road trip, we also perceived how some rural towns—once lively hubs filled with Basque social activities—now painfully languished, while others were certainly flourishing. It is a mixed sensation, a bitter-sweet feeling that comes to mind when I reflect back on the “health” of our Basque America. Are we writing the last chapters of the Basque culture book in the U.S.? I do not believe so or, at least, I do not want to believe it. I am not sure whether the answer to this question is based on evidence or just wishful thinking. Like many other things in life only time will tell.

Winnemucca

The Winnemucca Hotel, one of the oldest Basque boardinghouses in the American West, established in 1863 (Winnemucca, Nevada).

Elko1

The handball court in Elko, Nevada. A commemorative plaque for the mural reads as follows: “Ama, aita, euzkaldunak, inoiz ez dugu ahaztuko’…mother, father, Basques everywhere, we shall not forget! Our roots run deep.

Thank you all for your love, hospitality and support. Special thanks to those who opened their homes and lives by sharing their memories, some filled with hardships and struggles as well as with hopes and dreams. Indeed, our Basque roots run deep in the American West, and we barely scratched the surface.

Eskerrik asko eta ikusi arte…

On a personal note, “Basque Identity 2.0finally met “A Basque in Boise.”

Henar_Pedro

With Henar Chico in the “City of Trees.” (Photograph courtesy of Henar Chico)

[Except where otherwise noted, all photographs by Pedro J. Oiarzabal]

Creative_Commons


 

Zazpiak Bat Dance Group de San Francisco: Paso a paso desde hace 50 años

Fundado en Junio de 1960 en San Francisco, California, el Basque Club of California (Club Vasco de California) se convirtió rápidamente en un referente cultural tanto a nivel de las comunidades vascas del estado como a nivel nacional, contribuyendo, por ejemplo, a la creación de la federación de organizaciones vascas de Norte América (NABO) a principios de la década de 1970. En sus orígenes, el Club Vasco de San Francisco estuvo compuesto, en su gran mayoría, por vascos de Nafarroa Beherea y Nafarroa que habían emigrado a Estados Unidos en la década de 1940. Muchos de ellos tras la depresión económica de la Segunda Guerra Mundial decidieron trasladarse de las zonas rurales de California a San Francisco en busca de nuevas oportunidades, rejuveneciendo, de esta manera, a la comunidad vasca de la ciudad.

A día de hoy, varios clubes vascos continúan en activo en California. El decano de las asociaciones es el Kern County Basque Club, establecido en Bakersfield en 1944. A este le sigue el Southern California Basque Club, creado un año después en la localidad de Chino. Habrá que esperar a la década de 1960 para encontrarnos con una nueva hornada de asociaciones: El Club Vasco de California (San Francisco, 1960), Los Banos Basque Club (Los Banos, 1964), y Chino Basque Club (Chino, 1967).

Entre las actividades que tuvieron un mayor y temprano arraigo entre los socios del recién fundado club vasco de San Francisco se encuentra el grupo de danzas Zazpiak Bat Dance Group. Este primer fin de semana de Junio ha marcado el cincuenta aniversario de su primea actuación en público, siendo el grupo de danzas más antiguo de la Bahía de San Francisco. Al grupo de adultos se unió un grupo de danzas para niños llamado Gazteak, la primera banda de klika en el país, Zazpiak Bat Klika (1964), y el primer coro vasco del país, Elgarrekin (1979).

Zazpiak Bat Dance Group 1961

El grupo original de baile Zazpiak Bat en 1961. Sentados en primera fila (de izquierda a derecha): Mayie Camino y Bernadette Iribarren. Sentados segunda fila (de izquierda a derecha): Mayie Oçafrain, Anita Arduain, Christine Uharriet, Denise Ourtiague, Catherine Dunat y Louise Saparart. De pies (de izquierda a derecha): Juan Tellechea, Jeannot Laxague, Michel Duhalde, Michel Arduain, Michel Antoine, Michel Oyharçabal, Pierre Labat, Gratien Oçafrain, Frederic Fuldain y Paul Castech (Cortesía de la Colección Urazandi de San Francisco).

Frederic Fuldain fue el creador tanto del grupo de danzas de adultos—junto al instructor Juan Tellechea, de Lesaka—como de la banda de klika, a la vez que el organizador de los primeros torneos de mus y de pelota del club vasco. Nacido en Bidarrai en 1929, Fuldain emigró a Bakersfield en 1951 donde trabajo como pastor de ovejas durante tres años. De ahí se trasladó a San Francisco donde abrió su propio negocio de jardinería. Fuldain fue el Presidente de Honor del club durante treinta años. Falleció en Belmont, California a la edad de setenta y seis años. La idea original de Fuldain era incluir bailes de las provincias de Bizkaia y Gipuzkoa como complemento a los bailes de la provincia de Nafarroa Beherea—origen de la mayoría de los socios de aquel entonces. Su mano derecha en esta labor fue Tellechea. En los inicios los dantzaris fueron acompañados por el acordeonista Jim Etchepare y los txistularis Juan José y Carmelo San Mames y Abel Bolumburu.

Frederic Fuldain

Ceremonia de homenaje a Frederic Fuldain en el Centro Cultural Vasco de San Francisco el 2 de Abril de 1995 (Cortesía de la Colección Urazandi de San Francisco).

El grupo Gazteak fue creado por Michel Oyharçabal y Christine Maysonnave. En 1962, Pierre Etcharren, de Uharte-Garazi, se convirtió en el instructor del grupo de niños. Dos años después, tras el retorno de Tellechea a Euskal Herria, Etcharren se hizo también cargo del grupo de adultos. Cargo que ocupó durante veinticinco años. Desde entonces su hija, Valerie Etcharren, ha instruido a ambos grupos.

Desde Junio de 1961 hasta hoy, el Zazpiak Bat Dance Group ha actuado por todo el Oeste Americano y se ha consolidado como uno de los grupos de danza vasca más interesantes del país. En 1993 participaron en el Baztandarren Biltzarra de Elizondo bajo la atenta mirada del que fuera su primer instructor Juan Tellechea. Habían transcurrido veintinueve años.

“Euskaldunak Californian”

Dantzaris del Zazpiak Bat en Elizondo, Nafarroa en 1993. Primera fila (de izquierda a derecha): Martin Lasa, Xavier Oçafrain y Xavier Salaburu. Segunda fila (de izquierda a derecha): Idoya Salaburu, Isabelle Oillarburu, Maitexa Cuburu, Jeanette Etchamendy, Evelyne Etcharren, Elise Martinon, Rose Marie Etchamendy y Valerie Etcharren. Fila del fondo (de izquierda a derecha): Elisa Lasa, Isabelle Oçafrain, Valerie Gorostiague, Nicole Oçafrain y Stephanie Duhart (Cortesía de la Colección Urazandi de San Francisco).

Para conmemorar el quincuagésimo aniversario del Zazpiak Bat diferentes generaciones de bailarines van a actuar en el Centro Cultural Vasco de San Francisco durante el fin de semana del 27 y 28 de Agosto de este año. Emigrantes vascos llevaron consigo experiencias, valores, prácticas y tradiciones culturales, religiosas y lingüísticas a Estados Unidos, produciendo su propia interpretación de cultura e identidad vascas. Recrearon una cultura en un nuevo país contra todo pronóstico, siendo capaces de trasmitirla exitosamente a las nuevas generaciones de vascos nacidos en tierra americana. Hoy como hace cincuenta años, la comunidad vasca de San Francisco sigue demostrando la vitalidad y la capacidad de soñar y amar que les llevo a construir una nueva Euskal Herria a miles de kilómetros de distancia de Europa.

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The Digital Basque Diaspora in Boise, Idaho…

By the early 1990s, the Internet became generally available to the public, and in 1994 the first Basque website, http://www.buber.net, was created in the diaspora by Blas Uberuaga who grew up in the Basque community of Boise, Idaho. In the homeland, for instance, the Basque Autonomous Community government established its first website in October 1996.

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In 1997 the Basque club or euskal elkartea from Seattle, Washington, U.S., became the first Basque diaspora club ever to construct an online presence.  Seattle was soon followed by other clubs such as the Utah Basque Club from Salt Lake City, and the North American Basque Organizations (NABO) in 1998. In 1999, the Basque Museum and Cultural Center of Boise also established its own website. It became the first online representative of the Basque community of Boise.

Nearly 90% of the institutional websites (i.e., official sites of diaspora institutions) that comprise the Basque digital diaspora had been established in the new millennium. As of March 2009, the diaspora had formed 211 associations throughout twenty-four countries, of which 135 (or nearly 64%) had a presence in cyberspace in twenty countries (or over 83% of the total).

Basque community associations in Boise also became active and joined the Basque Museum and Cultural Center in cyberspace, while multiplying their online presence by combining different online platforms including blogs, websites, and social network sites such as Facebook and Twitter. This trend demonstrates a powerful potential for Basque diaspora expression online.

The Basque diaspora is utilizing the Web as a twenty-four-hour easy to use and inexpensive platform to communicate, interact, maintain identity, create and recreate social ties and networks to both their homelands and co-diaspora communities regardless of geographical distance and time zones due to the low cost, effectiveness, and speed of the Internet. Basque diaspora web sites, blogs and social network sites are platforms for communication, social interaction, and representation.

The majority of the Basque diaspora webmasters in the U.S. and throughout the world argue that the Internet has the potential to maintain Basque identity abroad in terms of information, interaction, and communication, while reconnecting individuals with their collective identity and with a larger global Basque community—homeland and diaspora.

In your opinion, what impact do the Internet and social network sites such as Facebook have on strengthening and maintaining Basque identity in the diaspora?

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‘.EUS’: Ziber-independentzia?!

En nombre de más de 68.000 individuos y asociaciones—incluyendo aquellas de la diáspora catalana—la asociación no-gubernamental catalana PuntCAT consiguió obtener en Septiembre de 2005 el dominio de Internet ‘.cat’ para la comunidad lingüística y cultural catalana (por ejemplo, la asociación catalana de Miami en Florida, “Friends of Catalonia”), por lo que el dominio ‘.cat’ se convirtió en el primer dominio de su clase en la historia de Internet.

Esto provocó la protesta airada del establishement político Español encabezado por el Partido Popular y el Gobierno de Valencia, quizás por el hecho de ser hijos de una generación ajena al mundo Internet y de intentar interpretar el dominio ‘.cat’ desde claves políticas tradicionales que poco o nada tienen que ver con los mundos digitales de Facebook o Bebo. Algunos incluso se adelantaron a cualquier futura petición del dominio ‘.ct’ ya que equivaldría al dominio ‘.es’ reservado para identificar a ciber-España. Ello implicaría a grosso modo poco menos que “la independencia política de Cataluña en Internet”. Es decir, solamente aquellos estados reconocidos por Naciones Unidas reciben los códigos de dos letras para ser identificados en Internet, como por ejemplo, ‘.it’ para Italia o ‘.ch’ para Suiza. (Sin embargo, hay excepciones como es el caso de Palestina que tiene su propio dominio, ‘.ps’).

El dominio ‘.cat’ fue inaugurado con 8.300 subscriptores y en el pasado mes de Abril existían 35.600 dominios ‘.cat’, entre los que se encuentra la propia Generalitat de Catalunya. En cuanto a las comunidades catalanas del exterior estas suman 126 y están repartidas en cuarenta y un países, pero tan solamente un poco más de un 60% tienen representación en Internet. A día de hoy sólo un 16% de la diáspora institucional digital catalana tienen dominio ‘.cat’. El ciberespacio no se “conquista” en un día.

Siguiendo el ejemplo catalán, otras asociaciones no-gubernamentales como PuntoGAL, PointBZH, DotSCO se constituyeron para conseguir los dominios ‘.gal,’ ‘.bzh,’ y ‘.sco’ para sus respectivas comunidades globales online de gallegos, bretones y escoceses. El 2 de Abril del 2008 once organizaciones de ámbitos lingüísticos, culturales, educacionales y de información, entre las que se incluye EiTB, UPV-EHU, y Euskaltzaindia, constituyeron la asociación PuntuEUS con el objetivo de conseguir el dominio ‘.eus’ para la comunidad cultural y lingüística vascas en Internet. En Enero del 2009 se hizo la presentación de la asociación en público. Los promotores lo dijeron claramente: “El Euskara se encuentra ante un nuevo reto: crear su propio nombre en Internet. En este espacio virtual, tanto la existencia de algo como su denominación van de la mano, por lo tanto, algo sin nombre, sencillamente, no existe. Y ese es el reto ante el cual se encuentra la Comunidad de la Lengua y la Cultura Vasca: crear un símbolo que permita su reconocimiento internacional en el espacio virtual de Internet: el dominio .EUS.”

http://www.puntueus.org/

http://www.puntueus.org/

Este pasado Junio se les unió el Centro de Estudios Vascos de la Universidad de Nevada, Reno, una de las primeras instituciones en instrumentalizar Internet en su oferta de cursos online en el mundo educativo vasco, y organismo educacional de referente en la diáspora vasca. De igual manera, la federación de organizaciones vascas de Norte América (NABO) se adhirió a PuntuEus este pasado viernes día 24 (en el marco de un gran programa festivo del que informamos en su día y que superó con creces cualquier expectativa previa gracias al buen hacer de su coordinadora Kate Camino, y de tantos otros voluntarios).

La hiper-sensibilidad de la política y de ésta llevada a Internet en términos de hiper-política, nos lleva a preguntar: ¿Volverían a repetirse similares argumentos esgrimidos en su día por ciertos sectores de la clase política en relación al dominio ‘.cat’ llegado el momento de la obtención del dominio ‘.eus’?

Quizás el debate debería de reconducirse teniendo en cuanta lo que implican herramientas globales de comunicación e interacción tales como Internet y para culturas como la vasca y lenguas minorizadas como el Euskera. A parte de los objetivos propuestos por los promotores del dominio ‘.eus’ ¿Qué supondría conseguir un propio dominio para la comunidad vasca online? ¿En que radicaría la diferencia de tener registrada una página web o blog de temática vasca, en Euskera, personal o de una empresa privada o institución pública vasca bajo el dominio ‘.eus’ en lugar de tenerla bajo el dominio ‘.com’, por ejemplo? ¿Cuál sería la diferencia en términos de usuarios, tráfico, o motores de búsqueda de sitios web?

¿Estarías dispuesto a sumarte a la campaña a favor del dominio ‘.eus’ y cambiar el dominio de tu web por el de ‘.eus’? Y si es así ¿Por qué?

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